What does a puppy need?

Richard AtchesonRichard Atcheson Northern USAPosts: 3,570Member
edited 6 August, 2010 in Puppy Place
A crate. It is only natural that a puppy resists its crate at first. What the puppy wants more than anything else is to be others, you, anyone else in the household, and any other pets. In our modern society, even if we are home, other things distract us from the attention an uncrated puppy must have. The only real solution is to crate the dog when you aren't around. The dog may be happier in its den than loose in the house. It relaxes, it feels safe in its den. It rests, the body slows down reducing the need for water and relieving its self. Dogs that have been crated all along do very well. Many of them will rest in their crates even when the door is open. Skip the bedding. At first it gets wet, and later it can be chewed into choking hazards. A wire rack in the bottom will help keep the puppy up out of accidents at first. They are available with the crates, but a piece of closely spaced wire closet shelving from a home supply place is cheaper. I think the plastic ones give the dog more of a safe, enclosed den feeling. Metal ones can be put in a corner or covered with something the dog can't pull in and chew. Select a crate just big enough for the full grown dog to stretch out in. At bed time, with a new puppy, I have found lying down in front of the crate like you were going to sleep and speaking softly to it, or singing, until it settles down and goes to sleep works very well. Follow the pattern, a period of active play, outside to eliminate, and then into the crate. Chew toys. The pet stores are full of toys that many dogs will quickly chew up into pieces they could choke on or cause intestinal blockages. If you are not there to watch, stick to sturdy stuff such as Nylabones and Kongs. Keep a close eye on chew toys and quickly discard anything that is coming apart in pieces. Rawhide is especially bad because it swells after being swallowed. These problems are the worst with, but not limited to, large, aggressive chewers such as Labs. Food. Find out what the breeder is feeding. If it is dry chow you can buy readily, I would stick with it until the dog is 4 months old, at that time switching to a dry adult chow for large breeds. If not, try to have the breeder give you a few days supply to use making a gradual change to a dry puppy chow. Dishes. Empty plastic food containers are good enough. If you want something nicer, buy the spill proof? ones. I have found them at Big Lots. A collar and leash. You should stay with a flat fabric or leather collar until your puppy is 5 months old. Then you can go with the metal slip collar with the rings on each end. Otherwise you could damage its windpipe. Put it on like this for the usual dog on the left position. Pull the chain through the one ring forming a"P". Facing the dog, slip it over its head. The free end comes over the neck allowing the other end to release pressure when the leash is slack. A five month old's head will still grow some. If you buy one that easily goes over the head, it still should come off leaving the ears when the dog finishes growing. I start the puppy out with a metal leash and switch to a leather one after the worst of the chewing is over and I need more control. A name, try http://www.lowchensaustralia.com/names/petnames.htm#1 and http://www.cat-dog-names.com/ A brush. Start the puppy with a bristle brush. They don't shed much at first, and the bristle brush will remove dirt and help control odor. When shedding becomes a problem later, switch to a slicker brush with the wire teeth. The number of a vet. It is very hard to evaluate them. Dogs need more medical care than in the past. Many new problems are wide spread. A book. Any book is better than none at all. I like the Monks of New Skete and their The Art of Raising a Puppy, ISBN 0-316-57839-8. Obedience training. A good obedience class or book is about you being top dog, not about rewarding standard commands with a treat. Start obedience training the day you get the dog. Build on the foundation of housebreaking. The younger the puppy, the shorter you must keep sessions, only a few repetitions at a time. A few minutes here and there, and by the time the puppy is 4 months old, people will be impressed with what a nice dog it is. A Dogster bookmark so you can come back for help as needed. I didn't forget treats, shampoo, and bedding. I seldom use them.
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Comments

  • edited 20 August, 2009
    There are lots of things! Flea and Tick stuff Collar and Leash Doggie toothbrush and Toothpaste Dog house Dog vitamins These are a couple items I have thought of!
  • Richard AtchesonRichard Atcheson Northern USAPosts: 3,570Member
    edited 21 August, 2009
    A dog house? Why a dog house? Dogs don't need their own house if they are inside with their family where they belong. A collar and leash? I have a whole paragraph onthem.
  • Maggie BohmMaggie Bohm Posts: 4,662Member
    edited 21 August, 2009
    room to run loving family time attention switching to an adult dog food at 4 months of age? You must be mis-informed. A large breed dog needs to stay on puppy food until they are 1 year old.
  • Richard AtchesonRichard Atcheson Northern USAPosts: 3,570Member
    edited 21 August, 2009
    Nobody but nobody knows more about producing large breed dogs with a long, active life than the service dog schools. They have been making an early switch for a long time. People should check around a little before suggesting somebody misinformed. Others are catching on to the idea, http://www.bullmastiffinfo.melkevbullmastiffs.com/food.html
  • Rebecca LandonRebecca Landon Posts: 5,368Member
    edited 21 August, 2009
    Dallas is right. Labs aren't large breeds anyhow. For any large breed, an adult food could be detrimental, you know that Aster, you just don't want to admit it. You've learned that the food needs to have the right calcium percentages, I've seen you post it in the answers forum. You just don't want to admit that you were wrong, because deep down you know that large breed puppy formulas *coincidentally* have the appropriate levels. Don't worry. I used to think protein caused growth disorders. I was wrong at one point too!!! It's okay to admit it!~a~ Oh and those others who are "catching on"? This isnt' catching on... It's old "science" based on theories about what was screwing up our giant breeds. http://www.dogworld.co.za/info/health_check/Nutrition_Large_Breed.pdf http://www.heartypet.com/blog/?p=66 http://www.hilarywatson.com/puppies.pdf http://www.beechmountanhosp.ca/feedinglgebreed.html http://www.thensome.com/hod.htm https://www.msu.edu/~silvar/hips.htm http://www.doglogic.com/debaunprotein.htm http://jn.nutrition.org/cgi/content/full/134/8/2151S http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12421852
  • Lis CareyLis Carey Posts: 5,402Member
    edited 21 August, 2009
    A crate. It is only natural that a puppy resists its crate at first. What the puppy wants more than anything else is to be others, you, anyone else in the household, and any other pets. In our modern society, even if we are home, other things distract us from the attention an uncrated puppy must have. The only real solution is to crate the dog when you aren't around. The dog may be happier in its den than loose in the house. It relaxes, it feels safe in its den. It rests, the body slows down reducing the need for water and relieving its self. Dogs that have been crated all along do very well. Many of them will rest in their crates even when the door is open. Skip the bedding. At first it gets wet, and later it can be chewed into choking hazards. A wire rack in the bottom will help keep the puppy up out of accidents at first. They are available with the crates, but a piece of closely spaced wire closet shelving from a home supply place is cheaper. I think the plastic ones give the dog more of a safe, enclosed den feeling. Metal ones can be put in a corner or covered with something the dog can't pull in and chew. Select a crate just big enough for the full grown dog to stretch out in. At bed time, with a new puppy, I have found lying down in front of the crate like you were going to sleep and speaking softly to it, or singing, until it settles down and goes to sleep works very well. Follow the pattern, a period of active play, outside to eliminate, and then into the crate. Getting a crate sized for the full grown dog works well as long as you get one with a divider, so that you can make the space the right size for the puppy. Giving the puppy too large a crate slows down the housetraining process, because they can eliminate on one part of the crate, and sleep or play in another part of it. If you use a wire rack as the flooring for your crate, with no bedding, you'll have a pup who's sleeping or standing or sitting on a wire grate. That's not comfortable. Good crates come with a plastic tray that will give the pup a solid, level surface to lie on, which will be more comfortable and secure. Good crates will come with both the plastic tray and the divider. There is no point in going cheap on the crate, if you want to make it last your dog's whole life. Food. Find out what the breeder is feeding. If it is dry chow you can buy readily, I would stick with it until the dog is 4 months old, at that time switching to a dry adult chow for large breeds. If not, try to have the breeder give you a few days supply to use making a gradual change to a dry puppy chow. Large breed puppies need to be on a good-quality large breed puppy formula, for the right nutrient balance. Whatever the breeder is feeding, canned or dry, good or bad, stick with it for at least a week or two before beginning a gradual switch to another food. Dishes. Empty plastic food containers are good enough. If you want something nicer, buy the spill proof? ones. I have found them at Big Lots. Empty plastic food containers won't stand up to a puppy's use, and there are lots of potential problems with using even plastic bowls designed to be pet food dishes. Ceramic or metal is the way to go, and they don't have to be at all expensive. A no-spill design is good. A collar and leash. You should stay with a flat fabric or leather collar until your puppy is 5 months old. Then you can go with the metal slip collar with the rings on each end. Otherwise you could damage its windpipe. Put it on like this for the usual dog on the left position. Pull the chain through the one ring forming a"P". Facing the dog, slip it over its head. The free end comes over the neck allowing the other end to release pressure when the leash is slack. A five month old's head will still grow some. If you buy one that easily goes over the head, it still should come off leaving the ears when the dog finishes growing. I start the puppy out with a metal leash and switch to a leather one after the worst of the chewing is over and I need more control. A metal slip collar is a training tool, and should never be used other than for short training sessions, no matter what age your dog is. There are a variety of good leather, nylon, and cloth collars available, depending on your dog's size, coat type, and other needs. If your dog really needs a slip collar of some kind, a martingale is much safer than a metal slip collar. Many sighthound owners do use them routinely because their dogs' heads are so narrow and their ears so close to the skull, a regular collar can slide right off, and the martingale, correctly sized, avoids this risk without the risk of choking the dog. Many people use a collar only to hang the tags on, and use either a harness or a head collar to walk the dog. Again, it depends on the dog, and on your needs. A brush. Start the puppy with a bristle brush. They don't shed much at first, and the bristle brush will remove dirt and help control odor. When shedding becomes a problem later, switch to a slicker brush with the wire teeth. Different coat types, different needs. Generic one-size-fits-all grooming advice will lead you astray. The number of a vet. It is very hard to evaluate them. Dogs need more medical care than in the past. Many new problems are wide spread. Fewer dogs are dying of parvo, distemper, or rabies, and so they live long enough to develop other problems that take longer to present. Yes, you need a good vet, and you do need to make some effort at evaluating them. I didn't forget treats, shampoo, and bedding. I seldom use them. Treats used correctly are invaluable for safe, effective, happy training. The dog has to sleep somewhere, and while it's fine if you want your dog to sleep on your bed and share the couch with you (I do!), the larger the dog, the less likely that is to be the case. Bedding inside the puppy's crate is a mistake at first, for the reasons you explain above, but once they're potty trained and past the chewing-everything stage, appropriate bedding will make their crate more comfortable and attractive for them. Shampoo--again, different breeds have different coat types and different grooming needs. For some breeds, rarely shampooing is appropriate. For others, it's a disaster. Consult your breeder.
  • Richard AtchesonRichard Atcheson Northern USAPosts: 3,570Member
    edited 21 August, 2009
    BamBam, you are saying you know more about Labs than the highly trained, highly experienced professionals at the service dog schools? I would love toknowwhere you have learned so much. Suppose you knew a breeder that bred hundreds of dogs a year, mostly Labs, Shepherds, and Goldens. They provided all the medical care for most of them the first year. At the end of it, they did a complete physical including hip X-rays on all of them. They then spent $35,000 training them before giving them away. They have a large data base of breeding records. Dogs with any physical or temperamental problems are unfit for the program and are a waste. Their well equipped clinic and vet staff are available for serious problems as long as the dog is working. When the dog is no longer able to work, it is replaced at again the $35,000 plus a large emotional upheaval for the person depending on the dog. They have experimented with different diets and exchanged data with other such breeders. Don't you think that what ever they are feeding is healthy and safe? What kinds of controlled studies do you have backing your choice of diet? How objective are the sources of your information? Is your dog's health, their top priority? I have been raising puppies since 1991 for a large dog guide school that does exactly that. What do they feed? They instruct us to feed Pro Plan chicken and rice puppy chow until 4 months and then switch to adult Pro Plan chicken and rice. I know enough of the people with the trained dogs to know they continue the Pro Plan. The group I meet with monthly for training includes people that have raised puppies for 6 different service dog schools. Some of them are feeding other common commercial chows including Iams and Eukanuba. Any dog owner wanting a healthy, long lived dog can make this regimen work, leaving more time to spend on the dog. It is also relatively economical.
  • themisfitbenji1themisfitbenji1 Posts: 6,990Member ✭✭✭
    edited 21 August, 2009
    Honestly, I wouldn't be concerned with what and how the breeder was feeding their dogs. I would be more concerned with why the breeder was breeding hundreds of dogs a year. A breeder is completly different from a large group of breeders. One breeder producing hundreds of puppies a year is nothing short of a puppy mill. However, a group of breeders (which I'm assuming is what you're part of?) breeding hundreds of dogs a year is a completely different thing. Anyway, a 4 month old puppy of any size shouldn't be switched to an adult food. They are in a crucial period in their life. Switching to an adult formula would take away many of the nutrients they need and could lead to born deformities, protein defincencies, vitamin defencencies and the list goes on. Just like with a human baby, it is very important for a puppy to get all the nutrition his body requires. A four month old puppy is still a puppy. My mom used to breed pomeranians- at four months, her puppies were still eating puppy chow. They were only weaned at 2 1/2-3 months! I'm also concerned with the fact that you said large breed. Large breeds should be on puppy food longer than small breeds because they take longer to mature and grow. I don't know what they teach at vet school these days, but when my mom went to school to be a vet... she learned that it's best to switch to an adult food at 12 months. :?
  • Richard AtchesonRichard Atcheson Northern USAPosts: 3,570Member
    edited 21 August, 2009
    Did you read my posts? I am talking about servide dog programs. I fail to se how somebody whose mother bred Pomerains knows more that the professionals in those programs. The fast growth puppy chows produce create excessive stress on developing joints. This is easily avoided by the early switch to adult food. this is very well proven.
  • edited 21 August, 2009
    Excellent post Addy! Aster would you kindly provide some links that show what keeping a large breed dog on puppy chow does to a growing dogs bones & joints? Keeping Great Pyrenees I have already looked into this but there are surely people here who haven't & need more than just your word on it...Ty.:-h eta: Aster, You keep talking about what the guide dog school you raise dogs for thinks but you don't provide any links for us to look at...I am wondering if the guide dog school people are your sole source of information pertaining to raising dogs?:?
  • Lis CareyLis Carey Posts: 5,402Member
    edited 21 August, 2009
    Did you read my posts? I am talking about servide dog programs. I fail to se how somebody whose mother bred Pomerains knows more that the professionals in those programs. At no point in your original post do you in any way suggest that you are talking specifically about raising service dogs. Even in subsequent posts, you at no point say, "I meant raising service dogs specifically," but simply cite an unnamed service dog program as a source of Authority. This is the first time you say that you mean this solely as a description of how service are raised by one organization that you do not name, and not a generalized description of how all dogs should be raised. So, yes, the experiences of a serious, responsible breeder of Pomeranians is just as relevant to most of us here than your extremely narrow focus, the more so as you didn't tell us you were focusing so narrowly. The fast growth puppy chows produce create excessive stress on developing joints. This is easily avoided by the early switch to adult food. this is very well proven. Standard puppy foods, yes. (You might want to take note of the fact that "puppy chow" is a trademarked brand-name.) That's why we have large breed puppy foods--foods that have the correct balance of nutrients for dogs that are not yet adults in their overall nutritional needs but who, yes, will risk developing excessive joint stress if they grow at the rate promoted by standard puppy foods.
  • edited 21 August, 2009
    Another excellent post Addy!=;
  • Richard AtchesonRichard Atcheson Northern USAPosts: 3,570Member
    edited 22 August, 2009
    Pippin, I find your post inexcusable. At various times I have explained the service dog schools are not in the business of educating the public in dog care. They don't put up links to what they do. I had posted about it being the practice of service dog schools and an ourside link in my one post. I think you and many of the regulars need to rexamine your fixed ideas and allow the possibility that the way you have always done it with no real reason may be wrong. You certainly haven't done much reading about dogs if you haven't encountered the early switch to adult food before.
  • Evelyn CummingsEvelyn Cummings Posts: 11,879Member
    edited 22 August, 2009
    I have raised Labradors for more than 40 years. I pride myself on breeding dogs with great hips, elbows and general health. For years I switched my dogs as puppies to adult food, believing that was the best. My dogs who were xrayed for hip and elbows were coming back with passing grades, mostly good. When times changed and research pointed out the benefits of keeping these dogs on a large breed puppy food I gave it a try. Hmm, suddenly the same breeding lines were coming back with OFA excellent hips and elbows. My last four males were all OFA excellent. Proof enough for me! I would like to point out that feeding Purina and Iams is mainly a choice of economics.... these companies provide breeders, especially those breeding service animals, with tremendous reduced price and other incentives for using their product...and why not... if these breeders recommend their foods then they will sell way, way more. It used to work but now people are becoming much more educated and do not just follow along with the crowd. In the last four years or so any puppies I sold went with a much higher quality food. Guess what. The owners all did their own research and kept up with these better foods. Best of all, their veternarians were thrilled and stressed over and over that the quality of the food the pup had been given was the main reason they had such a healthy puppy. Sure, Iams and Purina are still popular... popular with those trying to cut costs as much as they can and not do the best possible with their breeding program. Those of us who actually do some research are no longer following the leaders.
  • Jean RawlingsJean Rawlings Glastonbury, CTPosts: 4,287Member
    edited 22 August, 2009
    Devil's Advocate, as far as training goes- I find this blog post very interesting. Since we are somewhat on the subject, I'd like to know what everyone else thinks. Free Range Puppy Raising
  • Rebecca LandonRebecca Landon Posts: 5,368Member
    edited 22 August, 2009
    Aster... Did you ever consider that *maybe* just *maybe* the fact that they've been doing it for so long has something to do with why they still do it? It's old science. Mastiffs breeders I know from 30+ years back (and yes, i'd call them experts) still have a hard time wrapping their heads about it, but they do because they want whats best for their pups. It's hard to teach an old dog new tricks, in this case, it's clear. But Aster you can't deny that large breed puppy foods--the quality ones that lack ingredients that dogs don't NEED such as corn and wheat, and ingredients that can be poisonous to dogs such as ethoxyquin and synthetic vitamin K--seem to have the formulas right. If they didn't, Dog knows that dogster would be full of some screwed up big dogs, my mastiffs included, Zeus and Grace the bullmastiffs included, and many many many more. The reality is just because it's done for years upon years doesn't mean it's *right.* Does it hurt the dogs? No. But does current science reccommend it? NO. I fail to see where service dog schools compare with current nutritional science.
  • edited 22 August, 2009
    "You certainly haven't done much reading about dogs if you haven't encountered the early switch to adult food before." Actually it has been my practice to switch my dogs to adult food at 4 or 5 months but I've been rethinking that...I asked you to provide links for those who hadn't researched. & without links to proof it is only your word....:?
  • edited 22 August, 2009
    A dog needs a dog house for protection against the weather.
  • Evelyn CummingsEvelyn Cummings Posts: 11,879Member
    edited 22 August, 2009
    Any dog I sell is going to be a house dog and therefore does not need a dog house.... they have a nice, big warm house where they are loved and are treated as one of the family, which they are. When they are outside it is with constant supervision from their owner and, if the weather is bad, they will be brought right back inside and dried off and properly cared for after their nature call.
  • Evelyn CummingsEvelyn Cummings Posts: 11,879Member
    edited 22 August, 2009
    Chandler... I see it and I believe in it 100%. Up here in the country my dogs are able to run free often. All puppies I keep are out free with adults at least once everyday, with me there "supervising" However... they are in safe areas!!! During my supervision, I am usually gardening or such, and I do exactly as the article stated... if they are in my way it's "move over" and a slight nudge so I can walk by. I am much nicer about it than the adult dogs are!! From time to time I call the dogs all to me... those pups certainly come running when all the adults come to me. I may have them all sit or down, again, those pups get it right away. Of course, my dogs also do attend formal training classes as they get older, but by then they know what life is about and have learned about decision making and living by the rules set by the adults. For me it works, but I also need to point out that I am there with them, whether they be running wild outside or running wild in the house. Running while in the house does have more interference by me... perhaps because most of the problems in the house involve safety issues with manmade stuff like electric cords and glass cabinets and other hazzards and I do need to keep a closer eye on what's happening.
  • Judy MurdochJudy Murdoch Northern Lower MichiganPosts: 8,717Member
    edited 22 August, 2009
    Thank you, Addy for those enlightening posts, though you may be preaching to the choir. I don\'t think the person who needs to hear is listening. Choke collars :-O Feed adult food too soon?? Top dog training:-/ Rack in the crate:((:((
  • Lis CareyLis Carey Posts: 5,402Member
    edited 23 August, 2009
    Pippin, I find your post inexcusable. It's "inexcusable" to ask for links supporting your viewpoint? Really? When you are citing service dog schools as your authority? At various times I have explained the service dog schools are not in the business of educating the public in dog care. They don't put up links to what they do. They do generally have websites, and names, though. You keep citing your experience as a puppy raiser for a service dog school as your Authority for your pronouncements, but you haven't so much as named the organization. And, as I pointed out previously, nothing in your original post or the first few after that suggested you were talking only about service dogs, or even only about large breed dogs. I had posted about it being the practice of service dog schools and an ourside link in my one post. In your original post in this thread? No, you didn't. You posted two links to look at if you have no idea what to name your dog. And yes, I just went and looked again, to be sure. You did in your third post in this thread provide a link to a bullmastiff site that has an article by, apparently, a Golden breeder, written in 2001 and providing links to a few veterinary journal articles published in the early 1990s. It's been almost twenty years since then, and a few things have changed--including the availability of foods formulated specifically for large breed puppies. I think you and many of the regulars need to rexamine your fixed ideas and allow the possibility that the way you have always done it with no real reason may be wrong. If you are relying on research from almost two decades ago, and the practices of large organizations (which cannot turn on a dime) which have "always" done this, you may be mistaken about who it is that needs to re-examine fixed ideas and allow the possibility that what they have always done may be wrong. You certainly haven't done much reading about dogs if you haven't encountered the early switch to adult food before. Before the advent of foods specifically formulated for large breed puppies, the early switch to adult food was the best that could be done. Now, it isn't. Edited to fix broken tags.:r
  • Richard AtchesonRichard Atcheson Northern USAPosts: 3,570Member
    edited 15 September, 2009
    it is really a shame some good advice I posted has so much misinformation added.
  • Vanessa TaylorVanessa Taylor HastingsPosts: 962Member
    edited 23 August, 2009
    Really, I think that you shouldn't post if you can't tolerate people questioning your views, and if you cannot provide links and the like when asked. :? But that's just me.
  • edited 23 August, 2009
    Misinformation?...That is what we are trying to avoid in asking for proof of what you claim.:?
  • edited 24 August, 2009
    Aster, why can't you provide links to people? You want us to just take your word on it? I think you can't provide links because your just spewing what you think is true and can't admit when maybe else someone might be right..
  • Tiffany CarsonTiffany Carson St. MarysPosts: 15,800Member
    edited 24 August, 2009
    Dogster is a place for for dog lovers--everyone has an equal say in what goes into a thread, as long as no rules are broken. Let people contribute what they like, within reason. If you want to counter it, start a civil debate. As for misinformation--that's a touchy subject. There are so many views in the world, and Heaven knows, no one has it all right...thus, why don't we all keep an open mind and listen to each other's views, learn from each other, and share all our sides for ourselves and others to consider rather than whining about so-and-so's "misinformation"? And Aster, please, if you cannot provide links, then give us the name of this school so we can try to look it up somewhere ourselves. And if we decide not to believe it for any reason, whether you feel it's a legit reason or not, at least we looked at both sides. Nobody but nobody can agree on everything.
  • Richard AtchesonRichard Atcheson Northern USAPosts: 3,570Member
    edited 24 August, 2009
    Name the school so you can start berating them? Links? Like the ones BamBam posted that may be funded by companies making good money on premium large breed puppy food? Anybody with an agenda can put up a website with whatever they want on it. The first one didn't work. The second one had much of the some old misinformation most discussions of food on the net have.
  • edited 24 August, 2009
    I think the point here is that anybody who wants to make a claim, should be prepared to back it up with at least some sort of informal citation on a trusted authority. When you cannot even name the authority, or are afraid they may be "berated", then that 'authority' is probably not the best of sources. Instead of saying"Someone I know who has worked with dogs told me vaccinations were.. .....", it would do me a whole lot of good to instead say, "Dr. Jean Dodds, leading canine immunologist for over x number of years, as cited in magazines a, b, and c with studies funded by x y and z said.." Barring that, anyone can just claim anything. Sorry, Aster, but I don't just trust your word on canine nutrition just because you happen work with a yet-unnamed school, whom you don't want to subject to objective scrutiny. :? Plus, anyway to get back to the MAIN point, puppy foods don't just magically make dogs grow faster. There's a scientific reason why - higher fat content, higher calories, etc. If you are saying that keeping the puppies on puppy food for just 4 months and then switching to an adult food prevents bone problems, there's needs to be a scientific reason to your claim. Just because your school does that, does not make it scientifically correct. Pet owners care just as much about their pets as your school. Saying the school you work for produces hundreds of dogs a year for work, says nothing about scientific knowledge of nutrition. It only makes them a business, really.
  • Judy MurdochJudy Murdoch Northern Lower MichiganPosts: 8,717Member
    edited 24 August, 2009
    Misinformation??? It seems to me the original post was full of it. I hope a novice dog guardian does not read it and take it as reliable advice. The joys of the Internet.
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