Help the IAADP

Richard AtchesonRichard Atcheson Northern USAPosts: 3,570Member
edited 13 November, 2010 in Service & Therapy Dogs
In seeking info on vests, I cam across this. http://www.refresheverything.com/helpthedisabledandtheirdogs It seems like a no brainer to vote for them. Even in the best of times, the impaired struggle to be given a chance to earn a living. Medical treatment for a service dog can blow a hole in any budget.

Comments

  • Linden GueLinden Gue Posts: 623Member
    edited 10 November, 2010
    I'd be more willing to vote for them if they didn't exclude PSD work from their definition of valid service dogs. According to them, I'm a faker. Hallucination discernment is work, not a task.
  • Veronica MorrisVeronica Morris El Cerrito/SF Bay areaPosts: 14,677Member
    edited 10 November, 2010
    Well said Iris!
  • Gayle WillardGayle Willard Posts: 334Member
    edited 10 November, 2010
    Could you find it in your hearts to vote so other service animals could receive help if they've fallen ill/injured? Maybe one day an organization strictly for PSD's will ask for help from the service dog world and you'd like others' support? Other dog teams aren't responsible for IAADP's policies. They must have their reasons.
  • Linden GueLinden Gue Posts: 623Member
    edited 10 November, 2010
    What reasons could there be for excluding an entire class of people in the disabled community? I am happy to help local individuals financially whose SDs need vet care. I simply cannot support an organization that deems any PSD work other than tasks as invalid. It shows a lack of comprehension about my disability and the fact that IAADP has actively worked against PSDs being included in the ADA protections is the topping on the cake.
  • Gayle WillardGayle Willard Posts: 334Member
    edited 10 November, 2010
    I'm not versed in what their exclusions are or for what reason. They may think they have a legitimate reason. I don't understand what the difference is between work and tasks to begin with. Maybe you can explain what their differentiation is?
  • Linden GueLinden Gue Posts: 623Member
    edited 10 November, 2010
    It seems that IAADP is task oriented only. This makes sense for mitigating physical disabilities. If a person cannot pick up dropped objects, it is mitigating to have a dog to do this for the person. Mitigating cognitive disabilities often requires cognitive intervention. This is where IAADP seems to draw their line. They are fine with PSDs who perform discrete tasks to mitigate effects of a psychiatric disability, such as bracing for dizziness from medications. They do not recognize work such as what my PSDiT performs, which is leveraged from the dog's natural abilities. My ability to differentiate between reality and hallucination is damaged. Iris is naturally tuned in to what is real. I watch her constantly to give me the information I need to navigate reality. My missing cognition is replaced by that of my PSDiT. This is not specifically trained. The training to allow this to be useful is the public access training so that I can depend on her natural responses. IAADP has trouble with this. They would be comfortable with it if I had a specific command to tell Iris to scan the environment and to do something like bark if she saw something... But it works much smoother and faster for me to silently watch her and get my needed cues without the extra steps to make it a task. I think much of the problem comes from misunderstanding psychiatric disability. Those of us with psychiatric disabilities often don't need the same type of mitigation that someone with a physical disability might need. Cognitive disabilities require cognitive intervention. I'm using Iris's cognition to supplement my own cognition that isn't working properly.. It is incredibly useful. Do you think it is a valid use of a SD? It allows me to take public transportation, shop, and live my life. Without her, I can do none of these things.
  • Martha EubanksMartha Eubanks Posts: 7,349Member
    edited 10 November, 2010
    A task is something that can be easily demonstrated on command like turning on a light, bracing, picking up dropped objects. Work is something that can not be demonstrated on command like a medical alert. Even though my dog is not a PSD and has both tasks and work, I will not support an organization that is discriminatory. They not only discriminate against PSDs but also against medical alert dogs.
  • Gayle WillardGayle Willard Posts: 334Member
    edited 10 November, 2010
    Thank you for the explanation. Is this Iris' primary function? Or is she also trained to do other things for you? Okay, I think I get it....and because training her to do other tasks wouldn't necessarily mitigate YOUR particular disability then they don't qualify as legitimate tasks? Such as picking up dropped objects. I read the psychiatric qualifications on IAADP and I must admit that I'm not versed enough in MI to really understand all the different diagnosis' and what SDs can do to mitigate them. I don't understand what the difference could be between teaching a task and something aa dog does by instinct to help someone. And the ADA recognizes Iris' work as legit? And if so, then the IAADP should also. I do understand that the area of service dogs for psychiatric problems is a very broad category. And I'm sure there are a lot of fakers in this area too. It's something very hard to prove for most. But if the ADA recognizes these dogs then it seems unfair that a major organization like IAADP doesn't. Maybe they will have a change of heart one day.
  • Martha EubanksMartha Eubanks Posts: 7,349Member
    edited 10 November, 2010
    Yes, the ADA recognizes work. They just reaffirmed it. For alerts, they said that when the dog alerts, they go beyond just recognizing or picking up on something when they take action to alert the handler.
  • Grace KilbornGrace Kilborn Sanger, CAPosts: 562Member
    edited 11 November, 2010
    Wow I had no idea they were so backwards. They actually tried to get the ADA to revoke PSDs? Do you have some links for that Iris? I'd like to read about it. I was looking forward to joining them once John was a full SD but never mind. You vote with your dollars simple as that. Money doesn't have a conscience you cant tell it to only be spent on what you want once it leaves your hands so if you don't want your money to be spent on something you abhor then don't let it touch their fingers.
  • Gayle WillardGayle Willard Posts: 334Member
    edited 11 November, 2010
    I would suggest that anyone interested should visit the IAADP website and read the pages and pages of information on the types of PSDs that are allowed to join. I think it is only a small faction of SD's that aren't approved. And as Harley explained, it is because of this silly differentiation between dogs that are trained to do tasks, and those that just do work by instinct, I think I'm interpreting that right...
  • Gayle WillardGayle Willard Posts: 334Member
    edited 13 November, 2010
    I would suggest that anyone interested should visit the IAADP website and read the pages and pages of information on the types of PSDs that are allowed to join. I think it is only a small faction of SD's that aren't approved. And as Harley explained, it is because of this silly differentiation between dogs that are trained to do tasks, and those that just do work by instinct, I think I'm interpreting that right...
  • Gayle WillardGayle Willard Posts: 334Member
    edited 13 November, 2010
    I would suggest that anyone interested should visit the IAADP website and read the pages and pages of information on the types of PSDs that are allowed to join. I think it is only a small faction of SD's that aren't approved. And as Harley explained, it is because of this silly differentiation between dogs that are trained to do tasks, and those that just do work by instinct, I think I'm interpreting that right...
  • Veronica MorrisVeronica Morris El Cerrito/SF Bay areaPosts: 14,677Member
    edited 11 November, 2010
    IAADP's response to the DOJ in request for updating the ADA http://www.iaadp.org/iaadp-long-4pos-doj-ada-nprm-2008.html "Eliminate the phrase "do work" from the definition because it is redundant and the example of work given in the NPRM, grounding, undermines the Department's goal of maintaining a clear distinction between specially trained service animals and those animals whose mere presence can provide emotional support, companionship or therapeutic benefits. " ... "IAADP's concern is with the section in the NPRM that reads: "In contrast, the phrase 'do work' is slightly broader than ’perform tasks', and adds meaning to the definition." By definition all work is task defined thus to say "do work" is redundant and not needed. Another concern is the example given of a psychiatric service dog helping some individuals with dissociative identity disorder to remain grounded in time or place. By including grounding as work performed by a psychiatric service dog, the Department is providing the basis for an individual with a psychiatric disability to claim the mere presence of a dog, which helps ground him/her, meets the DOJ definition of a service animal. This reference contradicts the strong and clear statement that emotional support, companion or comfort animals do not meet the Department's definition of a service animal. It also contradicts the basic premise that a service animal performs a task to mitigate the effects of an individual’s disability. If included, this section will continue to be a source of confusion to the public, businesses and assistance dog partners. IAADP believes the reference to grounding should be eliminated, as well as the phrase "do work". " Also from the IAADP website, while they do list some work on their site (and plagarize majorly... but that's another story), they follow it with disclaimers that make it seem like work is just something extra and doesn't actually mitigate someone's disability majorly. Here's the one that follows grounding in place so that you don't bolt out of a meeting or somewhere like that. http://www.iaadp.org/psd_tasks.html " DISCLAIMER: Please understand that obedience to a Stay command to allow petting or the voluntary presence of a dog for petting is NOT a service dog task that will legally count as a trained task in a court of law. Nevertheless, I mention it here as a “Bonus Aid,” as it provides an emotional benefit that anecdotal reports suggest can be valuable to someone experiencing a panic attack, an anxiety attack or other kinds of emotional upsets."
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