Petting and Pit bulls

Richard AtchesonRichard Atcheson Northern USAPosts: 3,570Member
edited 26 December, 2010 in Service & Therapy Dogs
I wondered when I saw the lady with the Dobe dog guide if she has any fewer problems with people petting it than say with a Golden or some of the smaller other service dogs. Since them, I have seen many people here with Pitt Bulls. Do those of you that have them think it is any easier keep the public's hands off them? Some stuff on another site left me thinking that perhaps so many here have Pit Bulls is because to the ease of finding a good one. Likely the nice Labs or Goldens are quickly gone at a shelter. Those that don't know better or don't want to fight ignorance leave great dogs just because they are Pit Bulls. Their loss is your gain.

Comments

  • Gilda NonymousGilda Nonymous Los AngelesPosts: 240Member
    edited 21 December, 2010
    Many years ago, I knew a woman with spina bifida who self-trained her Doberman Pinscher. He was enormous, but a very sweet dog. She named him Bowie (she was a huge fan of David Bowie). It's truly sad when a particular breed gets a reputation that is not deserved.
  • Elizabeth KElizabeth K ChicagoPosts: 11,036Member
    edited 21 December, 2010
    I was wondering the same thing about German Shepherd service dogs, if maybe they get less people trying to distract/pet them? I've noticed I rarely get people asking to pet my friendly (non-SD) German Shepherd, and I can't even think of one time when anyone petted her without permission (not counting when I let her approach someone I knew liked dogs, and they petted her because she 'asked' for petting.) In contrast people always wanted to pet my Golden Retriever and would do "drive by petting" (walk past us and stick their hand out to pet her without asking or stopping) all the time!
  • Richard AtchesonRichard Atcheson Northern USAPosts: 3,570Member
    edited 21 December, 2010
    10 years ago we raised a Shepherd puppy and I never noticed much difference. With Shepherds being know for being suspicious of strangers, we had made an extra effort to get her out around people early. There still are people around that are afraid of Shepherds, but Rotts, Dobes, and Pit Bulls seem to be a bigger problem.
  • Carolyn DavidsonCarolyn Davidson WashingtonPosts: 990Member
    edited 21 December, 2010
    We dont get many people asking to pet Katana because he is a doberman. He loves working though. There are a couple people who will pet with out asking. My step-dad is bad about it and will do this kind of muzzle grab thing where he grabs Katana's muzzle and like pulls on it, or he will kinda tug on his ears. I have warned him that although Katana doesnt bite he just might not take kindly to having his ears messed with. Also my step-dad doesnt understand that when Katana is vested he is not to be bothered or distracted. He will bother Katana every chance he gets. I hate that and have told him many times to leave Katana alone and let him work because its like trying to bother a person's cane or walker. However he wont listen. I thought about telling him its against the law to pester a SD but he wouldnt listen to that either.
  • Sarah InmanSarah Inman Posts: 425Member
    edited 21 December, 2010
    Queenie is not a SD but we take her many dog friendly places. She does things for me at home but has the doggy equivalent of ADHD. Usually she because of her size she either scares people or folks want to ask if we sell her puppies (she is altered never had puppies). When people ask and she is not in a hyper mood and is able to listen to commands she can be petted. There is a kid that comes around on school breaks and takes her dirt bike riding. People mostly around here are scared of dogs, even small little ones. :-O I sometimes to ride with her in front seat of the car. She would sit up like a human. It is so funny to see the double takes people give.
  • Richard AtchesonRichard Atcheson Northern USAPosts: 3,570Member
    edited 21 December, 2010
    Yes, Katana, family can be difficult. I mentioned in another thread our friend having us sit her dog guide during family get togethers.
  • Karen WardKaren Ward EllsworthPosts: 2,980Member
    edited 22 December, 2010
    Sadie is a bullie breed she often mistaken for a pitbull (witch my vet told me really is a bullie breed and is only called a pit cause people nicked named them that) Any way I can attest kantana's frustration to cause I have been going through simular things to with family. Though the few times I took Sadie out to get her fimlar with different seroundings I had a few epasodes that there were walk by petting while she was in vest. She is well marked as a SDit too. so I guess those few are not afriad cause they never asked me if she was safe to pet just walked on by. and then one of the business people just started petting her with out asking if she was safe and then asked after fact. I told people near by who wanted to pet her not to cause I was trying to train her to not exspect petting. one or two did know not to and spoke up for me. I was in a mini mall and also in the process of doing my Laundry with help of my son. I think people had to put thier 2 cents in to it on how I was training her. or why I was training her.So it is like this if it is not the walk by petting it is getting someones unasked for advice. Sadie is very safe she loves people thing is she still has this jumping thing I am trying to break her of. some people mistake it as a aggression and and it really is not nothing about her behavyor is aggressive if anyone saw he body languge. But yeah is safe to say that I am best to let them think she is not friendly if they feel that way but I know that is not a good thing cause dogs since that. So I dont want her to get in to that habit either.
  • Veronica MorrisVeronica Morris El Cerrito/SF Bay areaPosts: 14,677Member
    edited 22 December, 2010
    With a vest on, Sabrina got much much more attention than Ollie because of her breed. She got more people wanting to pet, more people screaming and running away, more people with strong opinions. With a vest on, fewer people ask to pet Ollie because he is a more standard looking breed of service dog. No one has screamed and run away. A few people have been a bit frightened, but nothing that bad. So with a vest on, Sabrina wins for more attention. With a service vest off, Ollie wins for attention, though. With no vest, people are less likely to approach a strange pit bull than a strange poodle. I hope Iris comes on here soon to talk about her experiences where no one wants to pet Iris *until* she has her vest on.
  • K D PetersonK D Peterson Between NE FL and Ft Meade MDPosts: 3,211Member
    edited 22 December, 2010
    When I still had Bretta (Malinois), I noticed that the only people who wanted to pet her were the Korean Police K-9 handlers and the MWD handlers. Otherwise, it was like the parting of the Red Sea, even when in really crowded places. When we were out walking through Itaewon, only one or two people would try making noise at her (vs the never=ending amount that Scooter has to put up with) and never did drive-by petting. I've seen how one of the local guide teams (yellow lab paired with a college kid between 18 and 21) gets nearly trampled while on the subway or getting on/off the cars constantly. Then again, the same thing happens to most disabled people; I've seen them push/shove older blind folks that opt for cane use. This in a country that generally treats their elders with extreme respect. Also, as someone who has been into the APBTs for 26 years, a lot of it has to do with the dog. The majority of people want to pet Kodi (she's a seal color) because she comes off as very friendly and easygoing, while most treat Max the same way they treated Bretta; He's a "dirty" buckskin with flashy white markings with a bit of a black mask and he's taller. Mighty Mouse, on the other hand, is like a people magnet. He's adorable, seriously loves all people (never met a stranger), constantly looks like he is smiling, and is all of 30 pounds.
  • edited 22 December, 2010
    I'd have to agree with Ollie. While we don't vest Mak because right now we are training @ home depot, people still want to pet him. You encounter people that are scared, rude, and some just don't leave you alone. Mostly people want to pet Mak, I live in an area where Pitties and Pit mixes are very common. I've only met a few ignorant people scared of Mak. It's actually nice to educate. If I'm in a good mood I will let them pet Mak and explain that he's not a Pittie, but a Cane Corso. I understand why some people are scared. Some of our dogs are really tall, they look imposing no matter the breed. I think the fact that my dog comes to my waist line, makes people wonder if I can "control" him :)). But once they see how well behaved he is, they want to pet him. I love being a good representative for the breed =;
  • Richard AtchesonRichard Atcheson Northern USAPosts: 3,570Member
    edited 22 December, 2010
    Yes, there are those that fear any dog. I occasionally see bad reactions to a yellow Lab. I remember walking down the sidewalk with one of my puppies and a lady was unloading a bunch of children. The one little girl screamed and flattened herself against the van.
  • Abby JakoplicAbby Jakoplic Kansas CityPosts: 616Member
    edited 23 December, 2010
    I was wondering the same thing about German Shepherd service dogs, if maybe they get less people trying to distract/pet them? I've noticed I rarely get people asking to pet my friendly (non-SD) German Shepherd, and I can't even think of one time when anyone petted her without permission (not counting when I let her approach someone I knew liked dogs, and they petted her because she 'asked' for petting.) A few years ago (back when I was a kid) my family was a "puppy-raiser" family for Kansas Specialty Dog Service. The dog we socialized/trained was a GSD, and people were terrified of her. Taking her out in public, parents would grab their children and you could tell they were avoiding us. Even crowded places, it was like we had a 10-foot radius around us; despite the fact she was walking perfeclty on-lead and her cape clearly saying "Service Dog in Training". On the flip-side, I've had people PICK UP Josie before without asking! I was comparing products at the pet-store and felt the lead move, so I turned around and someone had walked up behind me and picked her up off the floor! (Josie isn't a SD, I don't have a SD.)
  • Karen WardKaren Ward EllsworthPosts: 2,980Member
    edited 26 December, 2010
    I think most of the time it dose not matter what the breed is sometimes people dont think and worse when the are not reading where a service dog is conserned. I wonder even though they even know better they just care they want to pet the dog and they do. Most people are ones whom have dogs at home or have been raised around dogs so hence not afraid of dogs so walking up and petting dogs are no big deal to them cause there is no fear factor. some think that smaller dogs cant be seriously SDs so they think it is ok to pet them. so on and so on is how it gos. I think wether it is a bullie or not breed it is what one would serficly say would be wether or not they are willing to risk a bite form a strange dog period and since the dog is in a store it is less likely to happen they would be thinking. even more safer is a vested dog cause of corse we all strive to make sure our dogs are not mean or fearful. I sometime think I should put a sighn on Sadie saying that that, "they need not worrie about the dog it is the owner who bites" or something to that effect. since most of our dogs are trained for mental issues any how that would make them woulder if taking a risk to pet the dog is worth a human bite witch is worse then a dog bite by the way.
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