Potential Akita Adoption

Joe KnappJoe Knapp Posts: 5Member
edited 7 August, 2012 in Akita
I am new to this site and found it while doing research on Akitas as I have never owned one much less know anything about them. This may be long so please bear with me. While at the local shelter we saw a white Akita with a black face that was left at the overnight cage so do not know if the owner brought her there or she got away and someone saw her and brought her to the kennel. After the 7 day waiting period she was never claimed. From the second we saw her she started wagging her tail and came right up to us and tried to lick us through the gate. We asked to take her out for a walk and she was such a joy. She immediatly went potty and we took her to the trail and sat on a bench. All she wanted to do was try to sit on my lap and lick and she especially loves the kids (boy 7 and girl 6) We have gone back 5 more times and took her out and she seems to love everyone she comes accross. If she sees another dog she just looks at it but that is it even though the other dog is barking like crazy. We would like to take the Akita home but after reading alot about them I have a few questions. I forgot to mention the Akita is 9 months old (female). We have a jack russell (female) that is 3 years old and I read Akita's do not get along well with dogs of the same sex and also that the jack russell is small. Are all Akita's this way and how would I know if there may be an issue? The Akita is still a puppy (9 months) so it may be fine now but could it change later? Since the Akita wagged its tail immediatly and has shown no agression is that a good sign that she was taken care of? We took her to the play pen and she loves to chase balls and sticks. Problem is she won't bring it back. She also tends to ignore me at times if I call her and at times will come running. We would love to take this dog home and get her the proper training but just a little concerned about the agressiveness that I have read. I have always owned labs and goldens so this will new for me but we seem to bonded instantly with her the second we took her out. All of our dogs have been rescued from the kennels that we have owned and have had great sucess. The Akita is very healthy and looks like it was very well taken care of which makes me think she got away from the owner and was not claimed. Also, she goes potty the second we take her out which leads me to believe she may be potty trained. Sorry for the long story.

Comments

  • Pam LaVignePam LaVigne Posts: 5,251Member
    edited 16 July, 2012
    The same sax agression is unfortunately true in most cases but will often not develop until as late as age 3-5 though typically at around a year and a half you will see signs. Akita's even as puppies can be a bit stubborn and willful,that is why alot of people give them up,they will often even if they know their commands perfectly,decide to listen when they are ready,not necessarily when you ask. I personally would not trust an Akita female alone with a female of another breed unless you can separate them with at least a door between them when you are not there to supervise. Akitas are wonderful with their families,adore children,but can be territorial and protective,they are not usually agressive or vicious. Please read some of the other threads in this forum where I and other experienced owners have explained what to expect realistically from an Akita. A good one is getting an Akita one or two questions where Lobo's person and I covered pretty well what to expect. Also if at all possible p-mail me and I will be happy to help. Pam (Mika&Kai's person)
  • Joe KnappJoe Knapp Posts: 5Member
    edited 16 July, 2012
    Thanks for the reply. We took Jackie (jack Russell) to meet the Akita and Jackie wanted nothing to do with the Akita. The Akita was egar to play but Jackie kept turning her back. When the Akita got too close Jackie would snap then walk away. Basically saying to stay out of my space. This is the first time though that Jackie did not growl or bark at another dog and after a while she calmed down but still would have nothing to do with the Akita. The Akita was ready to play and whined when we kept her back but never growled or barked. I do not now what the Akita would have done though to play.
  • Pam LaVignePam LaVigne Posts: 5,251Member
    edited 16 July, 2012
    My female likes to play pretty rough,she has a little pug pal she plays with who can give as good as he gets,and if he stops or she happens to get to rough he will yelp,and she will stop until he lets her know he is ready for more. My male on the other hand,likes toys more or just quiet companionship while he explores and sniffs,my sister has a little beagle female he just adores and they will run around her "doggy park" then lay quietly beside each other with something to chew while the other 2 are off roughousing.
  • Joe KnappJoe Knapp Posts: 5Member
    edited 17 July, 2012
    The Akita is 9 months to a year old based on the vet. The Akita does not seem to know any simple commands. Will she be hard to train at this age? All the dogs I have had have been caged trained and would like to have this one caged trained as well. Will this be difficult?
  • Pam LaVignePam LaVigne Posts: 5,251Member
    edited 17 July, 2012
    Learning simple commands should not be very difficult. You will have to find out what motivates her,for mine it was food. I used small pieces of baked chicken or all beef hotdogs with no fillers. Akitas must have soy,corn,&wheat free food,they are all common allergens. I have never crate trained mine because every attempt was met with the result that they urinated/defecated in the crate then laid in it crying like we were killing them. Akitas bond very tightly to their people,one more so than others but are respectful of any they live with. If you crate it is recommended that you do it in a way that she can always be near her people,even if it means having 2 crates. Other than that have patience,be consistent,be firm and be fair. Hope this helps.:)
  • Joe KnappJoe Knapp Posts: 5Member
    edited 17 July, 2012
    Thanks for the quick responses. We do not normally put our dog in the crate unless we are leaving. Our dog sleeps in her crate as well but that is by her choice. I would not know what the Alita would do if we left for a couple hours and she was left out of a crate. Especially with a small dog in the house. What dog food do you use?
  • Pam LaVignePam LaVigne Posts: 5,251Member
    edited 18 July, 2012
    Hopefully someone on the regular forums can help with crate training,ours never took to it,we were far more sucessful with tethering them to us,then allowing them loose in our room,they learned that our bedroom was the den and never soiled there. As far as food we use Blue Buffalo Wilderness. If that does not agree with your girl there ar many grain free foods to choose from,do remember that some looseness or diarrhea are normal during the transition from one food to another and plan to expect it. Once housebroken,separate rooms should be fine. I hope your plan to raise two females together works,I know it has been done sucessfully,I just wasn't brave enough to risk it with such large powerful dogs.
  • Joe KnappJoe Knapp Posts: 5Member
    edited 18 July, 2012
    I took a few pictures of her at the kennel but am unable to post or send you a message. May be since I am new. I was wanting someone to look at the pics and tell me if she looks full or a mixed breed.
  • Pam LaVignePam LaVigne Posts: 5,251Member
    edited 18 July, 2012
    I am guessing that you have a guest membership only. If you actually start a page with your other dog,you can post one pic of her on your other pets page,then using that pic,start her a page of her own and just remove it if you decide not to adopt.
  • April ShuylerApril Shuyler Posts: 640Member
    edited 20 July, 2012
    M&K, stop bein so darn fast with these! I wanna answer, too! :)) Anyways... Lobo is same-sex dog-aggressive, but he and the male pup he lives with are usually okay. Sometimes they sleep together, sometimes they want nothing to do with each other. We've only had one issue, and now any time together is supervised - which is how it should be, anyway. Training depends on you. I use clicker training, and it's worked wonders, M&K I believe doesn't use clicker training, but does use positive reinforcement basdd methods. If you've been reading, then I'm sure you've read that Akitas need an"dominant" hand and "leadership" and other dominance theory bullpie. Don't worry about the dominance crap - believe me. Lobo is fed the awesome raw meat diet, but there are some high quality kibbles out there. Poppy eats raw as well as Taste of the Wild. Blue Buffalo Wilderness has mixed reviews. It wasn't the right food for Lobo, but many dogs have done well on it. For a better idea of good foods, you can search Dog Food Analysis. Branching off a good diet is health. Please educate yourself in Akita health. It's almost scary the things they're susceptible to. Don't let it scare you, though. As long as you keep her healthy, your Akita will likely live a long and happy life. This is my own personal recommendation, and not something that is necessary, but it would be a good idea to find a Hollistic vet. I know M&K doesn't havr many vets in her area that will accept Akitas, so like I said, if your situation is like that, then obviously any vet is great. In my experience, Hollistic vets have just been less expensive and more knowledgeable. Mine will also use Western medicine if she has to, so she's not a bullheaded moron. :)) Anyways, M&K and I both are willing to help in any way. Good luck if you do adopt her.
  • Pam LaVignePam LaVigne Posts: 5,251Member
    edited 22 July, 2012
    Sorry Lobo I guess I just happen to be on a bit more often,and I know I am not the most patient in waiting for answers so I try to be quick. My vet is not Holistic specifically but more than happy to consider more than just the traditional Western medicine approach. No vet in my local area does accept Akitas or has no clue that their medical needs are different than other breeds,they for example are much more sensitive to most medications and therefore require less,some ingredients are also prone to cause problems if you choose to use flea & tick/heartworm meds. Akitas do not do frontline or Ivermetin well,Anesthesia can also be a problem. From age 2 on they should have thrroid tests. The first as a baseline then at least every other year to make sure it isn't a problem and of course at any sign of symptoms. PRA is also common,Allergies are common and can be odd,for example Mika had to have a second surgery after her spay to remove and replace every suture inside and out due to an allergy to catgut(suture material) so she had 2 surgeries in 48 hours. Skin problems are usually the first sign of most health problems.Spherocytosis is also a health issue,the blood cells are round and smaller,rather than normal shape and carry oxygen less effectively so if he/she is not speutered pre-surgical bloodwork is essential. They also do not tolerate heat well at all and can either become quite ill or suffer heat stroke quickly in temps over 75 degrees F. and should be watched closely. Lobo is also correct that I do not use clicker training but it is due to my physical limitations. I instead use a marker word and treat. For me an energetic & happy "Good pup" works as well as a click from a clicker. I suffer nerve pain and damage from a car accident and carpal tunnel syndrome as well so I am just not quick enough with the clicker. No problems with the method,just my ability to use it.
  • April ShuylerApril Shuyler Posts: 640Member
    edited 1 August, 2012
    It's fine~ I just don't check this area that often. Also, I believe I mentioned this somewhere, but Lobo has an autoimmune disorder. These are also quite common in Akitas. Bloat is also scarily common in them. That's right. I forgot you did use a type of marker training, M&K. Sorry. x.x This is my personal opinion, not meant to start anything, but I don't think that coercion or force is necessary for Akitas. In fact, from what I've read, it has made some a little aggressive and even more stubborn. And, yes, although I am a clicker trainer, I do think it's possible for some breeds to be stubborn. Akitas are not what you'd call "trick dogs." Some people think that this makes them slower than Border Collies, but I think their intelligence is up there with BC's. They just don't like to do anything if there's no reason for it. Lobo, for example, will only fetch so long before he walks away. He's more of a wrestle and run around like a lunatic type dog. He enjoys more physical play than anything. In training Lobo, even with clicker training, it was hard to keep him interested. He bores easily, and if things are too easy, he'll walk away. You have to make listening to you WORTH IT. M&K, didn't you say your first experience with an Akita was your GSD/Akita mix? How come the vets were fine with treating him, but a purebred Akita is an issue? How closed-minded... :( Makes me wonder if they know that GSDs are in Akita lines...
  • Pam LaVignePam LaVigne Posts: 5,251Member
    edited 1 August, 2012
    Lobo- Mattie looked as much if not more like a GSD,so I think they assumed that is what she was. Due to hher severe allergies looking like Demodex mange 2 of the local vets just wanted to euthanize her at 8 months anyway,that is when my grandmother suggested her vet who is a little more than 30 miles away but well worth the trip. He actually knows Akitas and adores them. He took excellent care of my Mattie and even cried with us when it was time to let her go. He and all of his current staff are amazing with Mika & Kai and he is very open to thinking outside the box. Also,knowing the breed for more than 20 years he has a vast understanding of the way they behave and why and is very thorough about the health conditions and symptoms of the breed. He was the first one not to say ,"You have a what/GSD mix? Was very helpful informative and willing to pass on his knowledge of the breed and it was Thanks to him we met Kai's breeder and got her approval,she uses him as well.
  • April ShuylerApril Shuyler Posts: 640Member
    edited 2 August, 2012
    Aahh, okay. That's really cool, then! I hope the other vets soon learn more about Akitas, though.
  • Pam LaVignePam LaVigne Posts: 5,251Member
    edited 7 August, 2012
    Not to worry our vet has added 4 new young vets to his staff who are just like him. So we will make the 30 mile one way trip,the service and care our pups get are well worth the extra miles.|:|
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