Pictorial History of Dog Breeds

NessieNessie Posts: 9,920Member
edited 20 April, 2011 in Choosing the Right Dog
Here\'s an interesting link, courtesy of a friend on FB: Pictorial History of Dog Breeds entitled \"Dogs of All Nations.\"

Comments

  • Jane JohnstonJane Johnston NMPosts: 2,957Member
    edited 17 April, 2011
    Neat link Watson! :) --des
  • Chanel ScottChanel Scott Las VegasPosts: 425Member
    edited 17 April, 2011
    whoa, that's awesome!
  • Kimi HKimi H SunderlandPosts: 2,257Member
    edited 17 April, 2011
    What?! No turnspit dog?! :)) Seriously though, cool to flip through! Thanks for the link. :D
  • RayneRayne DoulanPosts: 1,883Member
    edited 18 April, 2011
    That was cool! :D Did anyone notice the corded poodle?!:-O That one threw me for a loop!:))
  • Shanna PauliShanna Pauli British ColumbiaPosts: 896Member
    edited 18 April, 2011
    its amazing to see what breeds names have changed and what breeds dont look at all the same, and what breeds we simply do not have any more
  • Jessica DarakisJessica Darakis Long Island, New YorkPosts: 2,595Member
    edited 18 April, 2011
    fascinating! and it's actually a little sad to see how some breeds that were once functional are changed to the point where they are totally unrecognizable from what they originally were due to the whims of show fanciers :(
  • Kendall RutherfordKendall Rutherford DenverPosts: 170Member
    edited 18 April, 2011
    On the flip side, there are a few that I actually prefer the modern version of - the field spaniel, for example. The old field spaniel looks more like a sussex spaniel than anything else. A nice example that fads aren't entirely a modern phenomenon. I had read about the long-and-low field spaniels of yore, but I had never seen a picture. Of course, there are a bunch that look more functional than their modern-day counterparts. I just think it's interesting.
  • Emily CEmily C Posts: 94Member
    edited 18 April, 2011
    Cool stuff! I had no idea that Field Spaniels used to be that extreme either, they're so much more athletic looking now. I thought the whippet with cropped ears was interesting, I had no idea they used to do that.
  • Lacey KingstonLacey Kingston Posts: 7,527Member
    edited 18 April, 2011
    Pfft, no sled dogs except for one token picture of "sledge dogs."
  • Stephanie PykeStephanie Pyke OmahaPosts: 1,372Member
    edited 18 April, 2011
    I was surprised to see how many bassets there were. What happened to all of those breeds? The corded poodle is still around. there was just one in a recent televised dog show. It's all about how you train that hair to grow. Did you see how far back the schnauzer and the dobie's ears were cropped? it's just like they do to pitties now. So sad! GSD could be brindle too, I wonder what happened to that. they trimmed the fringe clean off of the schnauzer Hey epi, did you see the papillion under dutch dogs pg. 79? I was not aware that their tails were to be carried like a squirrel's. Also chihuahuas, round head sharp pointed nose and big ears. that's the deer head version so scorned by the AKC these days. I also noticed that the lady's dogs, some had odd ears just like Taggert does. So many breeds that are rare or extinct now. Does anyone have that Happa, the smooth coated version of a pekingese?
  • Mike JacobsenMike Jacobsen Posts: 53Member
    edited 18 April, 2011
    Let me apologize in advance to the purists out there. I must, again, after reviewing this history, say that all dog breeds are \"designer breeds.\" When I first started asking about such, even here, there were quite a few folks who were apparently quite upset with the notion. And I do understand, and respect, and share, the concerns about puppy mills, BYB, shelters, purposes for breeding, etc. and I did then. Second point. I wonder what dog breeds will look like 100 years from now. What breeds will be essentially \"extinct\" as we know them? And will these controversial \"designer dogs\" be the \"new breeds?\" Clearly history shows that some of the \"old\" \"designer breeds\" were very good choices. However, as I follow these threads I am frequently reminded of the negative consequences to dogs of purposive breeding choices. And not just in the area of \"designer breeds\" either. As we are making our big decision about the breed of our puppy, and we are doing MUCH research, as one should, I am trying to deal with all of the \"warnings,\" responsibly provided here, about breeders, \"strains,\" consequences of breeders choices, etc. Extremely complex, and always changing it seems. As it has been since the beginning of dogs. Thanks for your time. And thanks to all of you with the expert guidance to this point.=D>
  • Mike JacobsenMike Jacobsen Posts: 53Member
    edited 18 April, 2011
    Let me apologize in advance to the purists out there. I must, again, after reviewing this history, say that all dog breeds are \"designer breeds.\" When I first started asking about such, even here, there were quite a few folks who were apparently quite upset with the notion. And I do understand, and respect, and share, the concerns about puppy mills, BYB, shelters, purposes for breeding, etc. and I did then. Second point. I wonder what dog breeds will look like 100 years from now. What breeds will be essentially \"extinct\" as we know them? And will these controversial \"designer dogs\" be the \"new breeds?\" Clearly history shows that some of the \"old\" \"designer breeds\" were very good choices. However, as I follow these threads I am frequently reminded of the negative consequences to dogs of purposive breeding choices. And not just in the area of \"designer breeds\" either. As we are making our big decision about the breed of our puppy, and we are doing MUCH research, as one should, I am trying to deal with all of the \"warnings,\" responsibly provided here, about breeders, \"strains,\" consequences of breeders choices, etc. Extremely complex, and always changing it seems. As it has been since the beginning of dogs. Thanks for your time. And thanks to all of you with the expert guidance to this point.=D>
  • Alexa TravisAlexa Travis Birmingham, ALPosts: 4,692Member
    edited 18 April, 2011
    I must, again, after reviewing this history, say that all dog breeds are \"designer breeds. I\'m sorry, but where are you getting this from? The term \"designer breed\" is typically reserved for dogs who are direct 50/50 crosses of two purebred dogs, typically bred for the sole purpose of getting a cute name for a higher market value. Where are you seeing that in this book? Very few breeds were crossed \"just because\", and fewer still were 50/50 crosses of any two specific breeds. Most breeders at the time didn\'t even use actual \"breeds\" to create their dogs, as what was available and what was functionally the best typically made its way into the gene pool quicker than a pretty \"purebred\". PS- For those who might be curious; GSDs didn\'t just used to come in brindle, they also used to carry the gene for rough coat! Pretty neat, huh? (as long as we\'re reminiscing :)) )
  • Tiffany MitchellTiffany Mitchell IOWAPosts: 6,792Member
    edited 18 April, 2011
    I noticed the bassets as well. The boxer sure has changed! Among others of course. Mulder, love the rough coat :)
  • Jenny CollinsJenny Collins PortlandPosts: 712Member
    edited 18 April, 2011
    I think this is soo cool! not only is it neat to see how so many breeds have changed but how some look exactly the same! The two I found interesting that look different were the Bull Terrier an the Boxer. But some that look the same were the Flat coat and newf! Also is the "Gazelle" the saluki??
  • edited 18 April, 2011
    Cool link Dr. Watson:)
  • Kimi HKimi H SunderlandPosts: 2,257Member
    edited 19 April, 2011
    Guest, you either have a very poor understanding of what a "breed" is, or else you don't understand the term "designer breed." It is an understandable mistake to make, but your argument is a non-argument, because what a breed is is already defined. By definition, a breed isn't a breed until it breeds true. If I put two Dalmatians together the puppies will never, ever come out looking like Schnauzers. If I put a Dalmatian and a Collie together I have no idea what I'll get until they come out. That is the basic idea of why a Dalmatian is a breed and a "Dallie" is not. Even Cocker-Poodles, which have been crossbred by hobbyists long before doing the 50/50 "throw two dogs together and make up an insipid name from the two breed names" trend became the popular doggie moneymaking scheme, are not yet a breed despite having an actual "Cockapoo" breed club. They're working on it and someday we might yet see them in shows, but they're not there. When you're consistently breeding true, have a club and a purpose and goals, and are recognized by a kennel club, you've got a breed, until then, it's a "breed in the making" at best. You are correct in saying many breeds STARTED with crosses. Many older breeds, in fact, started with good old fashioned Heinz 57 MUTTS. But from there refining needs to be done before you can even begin to call what is resulting a breed. A cross is always a cross no matter how many times you repeat the cross. Breeding true is the goal, and if you are ethical and love dogs, you have other goals besides, relating to health, longevity, temperament, and possibly skill at a certain task.
  • Carissa MaleckiCarissa Malecki Posts: 7,383Member
    edited 19 April, 2011
    And will these controversial "designer dogs" be the "new breeds? No, because they aren't breeds...they don't breed true. When they do, then maybe? But based on the majority of people who are breeding these kinds of dogs, I'd say the odds of most of them breeding true anytime soon are pretty slim.
  • Dana LittDana Litt SeattlePosts: 13,594Member
    edited 19 April, 2011
    The breeds that caught my eye: the Bull Terrier, Doberman, GSD, and the Sheltie! Very cool link!!
  • JENNIFER BERGERONJENNIFER BERGERON Rockford, IllinoisPosts: 2,125Member
    edited 19 April, 2011
    Neat-o, thanks for posting the link! =; The bull terrier :-#:-#:-#
  • Mindy MalletteMindy Mallette Posts: 24,408Member
    edited 19 April, 2011
    Interesting. I had a book similar to that when I was a youngster. I think my grandfather owned it and I just took it to look at the doggy pictures.
  • Jessica DarakisJessica Darakis Long Island, New YorkPosts: 2,595Member
    edited 19 April, 2011
    I love the original Bull terrier. :(
  • Lindsay VollmarLindsay Vollmar ReadingPosts: 518Member
    edited 19 April, 2011
    Yeah, the old-style bull terrier is gorgeous. I really don't like their modern look as much.
  • Kylie DennisKylie Dennis TooelePosts: 1,805Member
    edited 20 April, 2011
    Very cool! But, but, but there is no Golden Retriever? :( Lol
  • hilhjknkljnihilhjknkljni Posts: 518Member
    edited 20 April, 2011
    I LOVE the original GSD. Beautiful dog.
  • Lucy OhannessianLucy Ohannessian Posts: 5,986Member
    edited 20 April, 2011
    FYI on the Field Spaniel references on this thread. Trends have often occurred in dog breeds. That is nothing new. And for a time, that heavier set, lower to the ground look was favored. So that is what you are seeing....the extremes of the day, as it were. They did not look like that before, and in time that more extreme look was considered function contrary and fell out of favor :) Dramatically so, as the breed went right along with it, almost fell out of obscurity and into extinction, but when revitalized off of a very few dogs left, with the exaggeration of type now abandoned.
  • edited 20 April, 2011
    Very cool link. Thanks!
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