:-/ Alpha Dog Training... SIGH.

Dayna HickmanDayna Hickman ChesterPosts: 2,149Member
edited 19 April, 2011 in Behavior & Training
I'm not going to say where this came from, only that it annoys the h.e.double hockey sticks out of me. "Alpha Dog Training~ Alpha dog training is necessary when your dog begins to misunderstand the social order in your household. If your dog starts displaying aggressive behavior and attempts to dominate you or members of your family, you should begin alpha dog training immediately. Dogs are rightly thought to be descendants of wolves. Wolves have a strongly defined social structure and clear rules for dominance and leadership. The wolf’s social system is known as a “pack,” and there is an accepted hierarchy in the pack. The pack is led by the alpha. The best of everything is reserved for the alpha, and the alpha gets everything first. Your pet, regardless of breed and temperament, has inherited a strong belief in this social order and may test the limits of his leadership in your home. Your home is your dog’s pack. If your dog is inclined toward leadership or social climbing, you may inadvertently awaken his alpha dog instincts. If you treat your dog as an equal, if you allow him special privileges, or if you consistently allow him to disobey commands, he may begin to consider himself the alpha dog–only an alpha would normally receive these privileges. And don’t be fooled by my use of the male pronoun–female dogs can aspire to the alpha position just as strongly. Dogs crave leadership and are more confident when they understand their place. It’s crucial for you to re-establish the proper relationships in your home through alpha dog training. You’re going to have to reclaim your spot as leader of the pack. A major portion of alpha dog training is attitude. Your body language and voice should exude a quiet confidence, authority, and expectation of obedience. A deep firm voice and straight, tall posture may be all you need to communicate your position to the average dog. If your pet is a natural leader or social climber you may need additional alpha dog training. The core of alpha dog training is reminding your dog of his place. Instead of allowing him to make demands on you, you must teach him that he has to earn what he gets. Give your dog a command (for example, make him sit) and give him his food only after he obeys. If he doesn’t obey, don’t feed him. Try again at twenty minute intervals until he obeys. And be sure you eat before he does. If it’s not your normal mealtime, eat a small snack and make sure he sees you. Don’t feed your dog table scraps during your own meal. Don’t allow your dog to go through a doorway ahead of you. Good alpha dog training demands that you (and everyone else in your family) go through the doorway first. Then he can pass through. Your dog should not be allowed to sleep in your bed. Alpha dog training teaches the dog that the best sleeping place in the house is reserved for humans. Never place yourself at or below the dog’s height. This means don’t lie in the floor watching television with your dog, and don’t roll around on the floor playing with your dog. If your dog is in your path, make him move. Don’t step over or around him even if you can. In the pack, the alpha makes the subordinate dogs get out of the way. Your alpha dog training has to mirror this behavior. One of the most critical aspects of alpha dog training is eye contact. If you make eye contact with your dog, it is crucial that you wait for your dog to avert his eyes first. If you look away first, you’ll only be reinforcing his alpha position. This means no staring contests with the dog for your children. Practice the “down” command rather than sit. Sit is a trick whereas down is a submissive position for a dog. Every time you have your dog do a down you are establishing your dominance. Alpha dog training takes time and patience, but everyone in your family will benefit. Your home will be safer and everyone will be happier–including your dog–when everyone understand their place in the pack." Sooo... I have the biggest problem with not playing with your dog on the floor, and the whole "make sure your dog sees you eat a snack" bit. I mean. REALLY?! I'm pretty sure my dogs aren't attempting to be the "alpha" and I NEVER eat first. Actually, I feed them first so they have full bellies when I feed myself. And if I was to pick out an "alpha" in my pack, Gunner would be it. Wanna know a secret? Gunner always lays down by his food and WATCHES Paisley and Pixie eat. He will not touch his food until they're done... I think it's stupid.

Comments

  • edited 14 April, 2011
    For all the claim is that dominance training is based in plain old leadership, I find these are the types of things these trainers say. here is a little list compiled by Helix Fairweather: HOW YOU CAN TELL YOUR DOG IS "DOMINANT" A list compiled by Helix Fairweather The following is a collection of behaviors that have been attributed to "dominance" over the many years that dog trainers have clung to that model. I solicited a group of trainers for everything they have heard or said that indicated a dog was dominant. Some of the entries have editorial comments after them. Those came from the person submitting that entry to the list. When an editorial comment is mine, it is prefaced with "HF:" I thought this list would be rather amusing and in a small way, I guess it is. But mostly it's sad and pathetic. My goodness, our poor dogs! They can't do much without being labeled "dominant". Can anyone picture the dog that doesn't do any of these behaviors? Has anyone ever met a dog who did none of these? They can't all be "dominant" now, can they? :-/ ------- Helix Fairweather, [email protected], June 2005 A dog has been labeled "dominant" for the following behaviors: 1. paw whacks 2. going through the doorway first 3. jumping up 4. not instantly performing whatever behavior was just cued 5. sitting/lying on the furniture 6. being destructive in the house 7. barking at strangers on the street 8. peeing in the house 9. pulling on the leash 10. leaning on people for petting 11. barking while family is eating 12. struggling with/trying to paw at head halter 13. chewing through leash 14. scraping feet after peeing or pooping 15. putting a foot on top of owner's foot 16. rushing out the door 17. walking in front of you 18. not getting out of the way 19. stealing a Kleenex 20. non-compliant dog, refusing to do as you ask 21. nudging, pawing, begging for attention 22. bumping into you 23. standing over you 24. putting dog paws on your shoulders 25. barking at you in response to a cue 26. stealing your items 27. house soiling past the usual expected time a dog should be trained 28. body slamming you with their rear end 29. having his "lipstick" out (HF: male dog, think about it, it took me a minute) 30. won't sit, down, or anything else unless he feels like it 31. barks at me when I yell at her 32. bites me (my favorite was the recommendation from a vet regarding a 5 -week- old rescue pup whose mother died, he instructed the foster mom to alpha roll the pup 3 times a day) 33. eats too fast (i'm not kidding) 34. won't come in the house 35. won't get off the bed/sofa 36. barks at strangers 37. barks at the cat 38. barks at cars 39. when in the car, barks at people who walk by the car 40. growls when i try to take his bone 41. growls when i try to take his toy 42. lays down when i'm walking him (young giant breed puppy, being walked 2 miles in the heat, idiot is lucky the pup is still alive!) 43. barks while i'm getting her meal 44. throws his food bowl around 45. mounts my 3 yr old 46. stood on my bed, looked me right in the eye and peed on my pillow 47. growled at other dog when they were introduced (after questioning the poster about the situation, they were introduced in a 6' x 6' hall where there were 4 adults and 3 children) 48. my puppy puts everything in her mouth 49. obeys my husband, doesn't listen to me 50. mounts me 51. mounts my brother in law 52. barks when left alone 53. pees in crate 54. isn't neutered 55. 8 week old puppy dives on golden, bites him 56. licks the bottom of my shoes (huh?) 57. is dominant over my other dog and my other dog gets hot spots 58. growls at me when i put her citronella collar on her 59. snores (another real eye opener for me!) 60. eats rocks 61. eats off of kids' plates 62. lunges at people 63. steals my shoes 64. poops on husband's clothes (in my never humble opinion, serves him right for leaving his clothes on the floor...tee hee) 65. stares at me 66. puts her paw on me when i pet her 67. when he's bad and i shake his scruff, he's started to growl at me (wow! what a good start at owner induced aggression!) 68. tried to bite my son when my son tried to drag him out from under the bed 69. when trying to grab his collar to take him inside or finish playing he starts running crazy away from you 70. always wants more food 71. peeing on your leg 72. not giving up items on request 73. being stubborn 74. growling, snarling, snapping, biting 75. sitting on owner's foot ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ This will blow right past some people. Sad This will elicit nods of agreement. Even Sadder It's still out there.
  • Lacey KingstonLacey Kingston Posts: 7,527Member
    edited 14 April, 2011
    Dogs are "thought" to be descendants of wolves? What? I'm pretty sure we put a solid answer to that eons ago. Sheesh!
  • Bella and Daisy BeautifulBella and Daisy Beautiful Posts: 5,136Member
    edited 14 April, 2011
    One thing caught my eye- "Your dog should not be allowed to sleep in your bed. Alpha dog training teaches the dog that the best sleeping place in the house is reserved for humans. " I guess I need to start sleeping in a crate. My girls don't like how the couch/bed moves under them and won't stay up on there. They sleep/rest in their crates on and of all day. It is the preferred location. :)):))
  • Leah StratesLeah Strates Posts: 2,684Member
    edited 15 April, 2011
    That sounds like Jan Fennel brand 'dog listening' to me. That was exactly how she structured her 'amichien bonding' technique. She reckoned she based it on Monty Robert's horse whispering (i.e using gestures) but I don't see the similarities really. I actually tried it for a while, out of curiosity - the whole standing tall thing, gesture eating, walking out the door first, ignoring the dog's greeting 'repertoire', blah blah blah. Didn't like it at all. Now I'm just following my gut, and letting the dog on the bed occasionally too. Something about pretending to eat dog chow just wasn't cool. :)) One size fits all bollocks, and anyone who has ever seen her show or read her book would have to agree. The only thing I ever agreed with is that dogs might get nervous when they feel the whole thing is out of control at home. Does that mean they're made uncomfortable by an inconsistent master, who might praise one minute and smack the next? Yes, probably.Does that mean they assume the role of 'leader'? Probably not. Even though her method (and many alpha methods) are pegged as 'non violent' I honestly think that days or even WEEKS of ignoring your dog (as she oftentimes advocated) is far nastier than a light smack on the bum. (And no, I do not hit my dog.) There is oftentimes hidden cruelty in these 'non-violent' methods, like amichien bonding or dominance method, and unfortunately, lots of people get dragged in by the hype!
  • Lindsey NocommentLindsey Nocomment Seattle, WAPosts: 704Member
    edited 15 April, 2011
    After removing the behaviors that she doesn't do I was left with THIS!! And here I was all ignorant!! Gosh, I've got a BEAST on my hands :)) 1. paw whacks 2. going through the doorway first 3. jumping up 4. not instantly performing whatever behavior was just cued 5. sitting/lying on the furniture 6. being destructive in the house 7. barking at strangers on the street 8. peeing in the house rarely, but it did happen a bit when we first got her 9. pulling on the leash 10. leaning on people for petting 13. chewing through leash 14. scraping feet after peeing or pooping 15. putting a foot on top of owner's foot 16. rushing out the door 17. walking in front of you 18. not getting out of the way 19. stealing a Kleenex paper towel fiend!! 20. non-compliant dog, refusing to do as you ask 21. nudging, pawing, begging for attention 22. bumping into you 23. standing over you 26. stealing your items 27. house soiling past the usual expected time a dog should be trained again rarely, but this dominant girl has done it 28. body slamming you with their rear end 30. won't sit, down, or anything else unless he feels like it as her motto says: princess eleanor... we're working on it :) 32. bites me (my favorite was the recommendation from a vet regarding a 5 -week- old rescue pup whose mother died, he instructed the foster mom to alpha roll the pup 3 times a day) during play, yes 34. won't come in the house 35. won't get off the bed/sofa 36. barks at strangers 39. when in the car, barks at people who walk by the car 44. throws his food bowl around 52. barks when left alone 53. pees in crate our fault if she does!! 56. licks the bottom of my shoes (huh?) I had no idea.... :? 63. steals my shoes 65. stares at me intently 66. puts her paw on me when i pet her 72. not giving up items on request 73. being stubborn 75. sitting on owner's foot ETA: Granted, some of these I am working to eliminate!
  • Kimi HKimi H SunderlandPosts: 2,257Member
    edited 15 April, 2011
    Ohgeez, Jan Fennel. I read one of her books, Jackson, and I had a funny feeling through a lot of what she had to say. Didn't sit right with me at all. Combination of ignoring your dog and posturing at 'em to manipulate behavior, along with something of a fetish for self-sacrificing martyrdom making the best owner or something. :-/
  • edited 15 April, 2011
    Dogs are "thought" to be descendants of wolves? What? I'm pretty sure we put a solid answer to that eons ago. Sheesh! Again, no. YOU may not believe it, but I can assure you that there are tons of trainers and owners out there that do believe this. Just had a client whose trainer told them that if the dog misbehaves they need to pick her up by the cscruff of the neck and growl in her face. Now the dog has a few behavioral issues (really? Ya think)?. When I told them not to do that anymore, they looked at me like I had grown another head and could not believe I would NOT be of the same mind as the former trainer. And much as it was made fun of, the people who think these things ARE the ones wearing dominance colored glasses. If you believe your dog is chasing a laser light or shadows out of a desire to dominate, if you believe your dog leans on you out of a desire to dominate, if you believe your dog jumps on the table and eats your food out of a desire to dominate, if you believe the dog chases the cat out of a desire to dominate and the cat chases the dog back out of a desire to dominate, well, then you are wearing dominance colored glasses.
  • Caren CorkinsCaren Corkins Posts: 4,567Member
    edited 15 April, 2011
    "you are wearing dominance colored glasses." :)) Did anyone ever decide what color those are? "If you believe your dog is chasing a laser light or shadows out of a desire to dominate, if you believe your dog leans on you out of a desire to dominate, if you believe your dog jumps on the table and eats your food out of a desire to dominate, if you believe the dog chases the cat out of a desire to dominate"....well, that just goes to show you that there are extremists and fanatics everywhere. :))
  • Tiffany MitchellTiffany Mitchell IOWAPosts: 6,792Member
    edited 16 April, 2011
    ...but that\'s just it. It\'s not \"extremists and fanatics\", it\'s everyday folks... I\'m with other lists and groups (terrier mostly) and yes these are reasons listed for dogs being dominant. The ones that get me are the puppy ones:n:
  • Caren CorkinsCaren Corkins Posts: 4,567Member
    edited 16 April, 2011
    "...but that's just it. It's not "extremists and fanatics", it's everyday folks..." Absolutely - on both sides - which are NOT representative of the majority of really good trainers on EITHER side of the coin. :D
  • Mike JacobsenMike Jacobsen Posts: 53Member
    edited 18 April, 2011
    My daughters dog, who adores us, and always pees at first greeting with us, always trys to \"touch\" me when possible. Puts her paw on \"mine\" if possible. We played a major role in her puppy training. We send our daughter\'s family a box and her dog obsesses about the box. Looking for us I guess. So, if possible, when the dog is becoming too annoying in her \"love\" I give the command \"lay down\" and she lays down as close to me as is possible and then she \"touches me\" as long as possible with a paw. I always thought we were just \"holding hands.\" Now I learn she is trying to \"dominate\" me? Hmmmmmmm. :?
  • edited 18 April, 2011
    "If you believe your dog is chasing a laser light or shadows out of a desire to dominate, if you believe your dog leans on you out of a desire to dominate, if you believe your dog jumps on the table and eats your food out of a desire to dominate, if you believe the dog chases the cat out of a desire to dominate"....well, that just goes to show you that there are extremists and fanatics everywhere. Cain, each of those is from an episode of The Dog Whisperer. Of course, I believe he is an extremist and a bit of a fanatic, but I thought you believed otherwise?
  • Caren CorkinsCaren Corkins Posts: 4,567Member
    edited 18 April, 2011
    "Cain, each of those is from an episode of The Dog Whisperer. Of course, I believe he is an extremist and a bit of a fanatic, but I thought you believed otherwise?" Seems that you watch the Dog Whisperer far more than I do - :)) - in fact, I don't really watch TV at all, so I miss out on all those juicy tidbits that get posted as 'verification' of abusive behaviors. :)) I would not call CM a fanatic (although I certainly do not agree with many of the methods he has used while working with dogs) SIMPLY 1. because he is willing to listen and be open to alternative approaches to training, is willing to modify his approach, and is civilized and courteous about it, and 2. I tend to not make those sorts of judgments about celebrities, or anyone else, actually, unless I'm confronted with factual, face to face confirmation of their behavior. Fanatics won't and don't do that - they criticize and become outraged at anything that doesn't follow what they think is the "right way", and are certainly not open to reasonable discussion about it.
  • Lucy OhannessianLucy Ohannessian Posts: 5,986Member
    edited 19 April, 2011
    BAM! That is exactly so, Cain. The definition of fanaticism. Churchill said....""A fanatic is one who can't change his mind and won't change the subject." Wow does THAT sound familiar :)) Another CM thread, perhaps? CM has a POV. He is aware others have alternate points of view, and is fine with that. Says so. There are many approaches....find what works for you. He says that, too. On his show, he has used things the owners are used to using that he would not use himself. He has occasionally brought in trainers whose approach varies from his own. It is not important to CM that his way be the only way. It is what has worked for him.
  • Lucy OhannessianLucy Ohannessian Posts: 5,986Member
    edited 19 April, 2011
    I do have to add, because of the extreme resonance in my backdrop right now. I have in my care (foster) a Bluetick who is a highly abused dog who has had a very sad life thus far. She's extremely cautious. "Caution" to me is a more functional timidity. She is not skittish, but she is very concerned about one heck of a lot, has a very long, sad coonhound face, is not very trusting. Subdued. She sure was raising some heck in my place last night, though. She was Roo-Roo'ing two nights ago when I let my foster pups out....two four month olds, a Chow mix and a Mastiff mix. I didn't really know if she wanted to attack them or play, but figured what the hey.....the are resilient puppies. So out she went and proceeded to ignore them and follow me around with a long, pathetic face. Growled at them a few times. Seemed put out by the whole affair. Night two, again with the Roo-Roo'ing stuff. So out again she went. I don't believe in OVER focusing on stress. Some might say all her clamor was stress by these puppies. But dogs want to be dogs. That is what I know. So I let her out again. Got a bit of the same, but the tail was higher. She seemed a wee bit more relaxed. Duncan lives downstairs and Dennis and I are helping her paint her kitchen. I figured it was ok to leave the troop alone. We are downstairs and hearing Roo-Roo'ing like nuts, lots of thumping. I go up and check. She bounds to the door like a retriever, races off. They are playing. Her play style is bizarre and I doubt she has played much, but she is trying. I leave again, finish my work. I come back to a Miss Enthusiam, sassy pants sort of a dog with a higher held waggy tail than I have seen since her arrival. She's still barely playing with them as she doesn't really know how, doing these odd moves that they can barely make out....but be that as it may, they are thundering around my place, making a mess and acting insane. When I go to prepare their food bowls, she HURLS her front onto the counter....just sort of full of herself, full of enthusiasm. And catch this....HAPPY! She is panting from exertion, smiling and sort of celebrating. So I dunno. We can pooh things all we want. Narrow the door enough to where light barely peaks through. Or, we can stay where we want, but with that door swung wide open, to always get a good view of what rests outside our boundaries....even to the point where we aren't neurotic over it perhaps wandering in from time to time. And that is a far more relaxing and potentially enriching place to be. CM does a lot of things wrong, but he is an unequivocal leader when it comes to the subject of dog-to-dog mentorship, which is something I have always believed in. We can sit there with our studies, how-to books, research papers and glossary of scientific approaches. Success rates known, studies done. PERFECT cognitive control. Whatever have you. But no one can talk to a dog like another dog. No one can teach dog as well as another dog. I would far from say it is always the way, but when the potential is there, you GRAB it. I love having Tiller as a foster bro because he exudes protectiveness and confidence, but also is gentle and tolerant, and my foster dogs usually gravitate to him and gain something from him. And then of course you have windows of opportunities like this Coonhound and the puppies. Where she wants but does not know how. So you do what when you are experienced you know you ought do.....you put down the books, the tools, the leads, the studies, and you let her go. And within an hour look upon a chained, abused, litter losing, two HW treatment surviving, "indifferent or fearful around other dogs" dog who has come surprisingly to life, exuding a joy and enthusiasm that, according to her, was always elusive, but she never lost hope. And now gallops around in some odd like slapped together shelter pack. She does not know how to play, but to her the learning brings her alive and returns her to a joy she has probably not known since she was six weeks old. I can never give her that, and I am humble enough to admit it. A lot of what CM says is misled, but a lot of what he knows and a lot of what he and he alone is expert in....dog-to-dog rehabilitation.....is priceless. So my door stays wide open. So that I can hopefully gain some pearls of wisdom when it comes to this issue from the one person who is, like it or not, the master of the artform.
  • louise nichollouise nichol Posts: 74,667Member
    edited 19 April, 2011
    If you treat your dog as an equal, if you allow him special privileges, or if you consistently allow him to disobey commands, he may begin to consider himself the alpha dog–only an alpha would normally receive these privileges Guess that makes my two "alphas" :)) Honestly, what a load of nonsense!
  • Jessica VockellJessica Vockell Hamilton, OhioPosts: 1,171Member
    edited 19 April, 2011
    I have raging beasts lol :)) 1. paw whacks DIESEL does this everyday 2. going through the doorway first RAMBO we are working on it though 3. jumping up RAMBO and DIESEL do if invite them to 4. not instantly performing whatever behavior was just cued Um BULLY Breed 5. sitting/lying on the furniture N/A 6. being destructive in the house Does swallowing gloves count :? 7. barking at strangers on the street I would hope they would let me know if someone is near. 8. peeing in the house OOps still happens once in a blue moon 9. pulling on the leash EH, sometimes 10. leaning on people for petting RAMBO 11. barking while family is eating N/A 12. struggling with/trying to paw at head halter N/A 13. chewing through leash N/A 14. scraping feet after peeing or pooping N/A 15. putting a foot on top of owner\'s foot DIESEL, i think he just loves to feel us close to him :-) 16. rushing out the door RAMBO when he off leash and we are going outside to play 17. walking in front of you I sometimes allow this when we are long walks 18. not getting out of the way again BULLY breeds lol 19. stealing a Kleenex HUH???? 20. non-compliant dog, refusing to do as you ask See number 4 21. nudging, pawing, begging for attention DIESEL and RAMBO, what can i say, i am a sucker for a hug and paw 22. bumping into you really though, come on 23. standing over you When i\'m on the floor playing with them over course they are going to stand over me, sheesh 24. putting dog paws on your shoulders I don\'t allow this 25. barking at you in response to a cue Nope 26. stealing your items N/A 27. house soiling past the usual expected time a dog should be trained Really, some dogs just don\'t catch on 28. body slamming you with their rear end what?? 29. having his \"lipstick\" out (HF: male dog, think about it, it took me a minute) Not since they have been neutered 30. won\'t sit, down, or anything else unless he feels like it again see number 4 31. barks at me when I yell at her When we play yes 32. bites me (my favorite was the recommendation from a vet regarding a 5 -week- old rescue pup whose mother died, he instructed the foster mom to alpha roll the pup 3 times a day) I\'m speechless 33. eats too fast (i\'m not kidding) DIESEL Gulp Gulp swallow 34. won\'t come in the house DIESEL, we are working on it, its getting better though 35. won\'t get off the bed/sofa N/A 36. barks at strangers See number 7 37. barks at the cat DIESEL and RAMBO, i think they see a cat and think YUMMY, cats are a no go around them 38. barks at cars Nope 39. when in the car, barks at people who walk by the car If they are scary looking 40. growls when i try to take his bone Nope 41. growls when i try to take his toy Nope 42. lays down when i\'m walking him (young giant breed puppy, being walked 2 miles in the heat, idiot is lucky the pup is still alive!) Nope. 43. barks while i\'m getting her meal Wouldn\'t you if i was taking FOREVER 44. throws his food bowl around again wouldn\'t you if you were STARVING 45. mounts my 3 yr old N/A 46. stood on my bed, looked me right in the eye and peed on my pillow N/A 47. growled at other dog when they were introduced (after questioning the poster about the situation, they were introduced in a 6\' x 6\' hall where there were 4 adults and 3 children) N/A 48. my puppy puts everything in her mouth Really?? 49. obeys my husband, doesn\'t listen to me DIESEL until we went to OB classes, now we are about even :-) 50. mounts me Nope 51. mounts my brother in law Nope 52. barks when left alone Nope 53. pees in crate Nope 54. isn\'t neutered They are Neutered 55. 8 week old puppy dives on golden, bites him GRRRR Ima get you golden 56. licks the bottom of my shoes (huh?) UMMMM 57. is dominant over my other dog and my other dog gets hot spots UMMMM????? 58. growls at me when i put her citronella collar on her And what exactly is she supposed to do otherwise 59. snores (another real eye opener for me!) DIESEL, wakes me up 60. eats rocks Scary 61. eats off of kids\' plates I would hope not 62. lunges at people N/A 63. steals my shoes Not mine, my sons and my hubby\'s ;-) 64. poops on husband\'s clothes (in my never humble opinion, serves him right for leaving his clothes on the floor...tee hee) N/A 65. stares at me All the time 66. puts her paw on me when i pet her DIESEL, again i think he loves touching us 67. when he\'s bad and i shake his scruff, he\'s started to growl at me (wow! what a good start at owner induced aggression!) I don\'t want to find out 68. tried to bite my son when my son tried to drag him out from under the bed N/A 69. when trying to grab his collar to take him inside or finish playing he starts running crazy away from you HA HA you can\'t catch me 70. always wants more food DIESEL, he will eat himself to death if he could 71. peeing on your leg Nope 72. not giving up items on request DIESEL, we are working on this 73. being stubborn BULLY Breed 74. growling, snarling, snapping, biting Depending on the situation...they are dogs 75. sitting on owner\'s foot Diesel
  • edited 19 April, 2011
    Here is a really nice list: http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/articles/dominatebehaviorsdogs.htm Gotta love it.
  • Bunny_PrincesseLilyCGNBunny_PrincesseLilyCGN bathurstPosts: 9,421Member ✭✭✭
    edited 19 April, 2011
    From Asher's link: "Caring themselves with a proud gait, head held high." Isn't this almost what it says in the standard for Chis?;)
  • NessieNessie Posts: 9,920Member
    edited 19 April, 2011
    Great story about your bluetick gal! And wonderfully put: \"Narrow the door enough to where light barely peaks through. Or, we can stay where we want, but with that door swung wide open, to always get a good view of what rests outside our boundaries....even to the point where we aren\'t neurotic over it perhaps wandering in from time to time. And that is a far more relaxing and potentially enriching place to be.\"
  • DesignerDogCugletDesignerDogCuglet Posts: 15Member
    Unknown posted that list from dogbreedinfo.com, and when I looked at it, I saw that a dog placing a toy in your hand to get you to play with it is dominance. Wait, so dominance is both control over resources and relinquishing those resources in order to have fun. HOW IS A DOG WHO GIVES YOU A TOY DOMINANT?!?! My dog used to do that, and that was the sweetest thing ever. it was not dominance!
    Caren Corkins
    I agree! Cesar's personality seems much nicer than some positive dog trainers (they scare me!) I love clicker training, but Cesar's methods can work, to. They are based on flooding, desensitization, learned helplessness, negative reinforcement, and positive punishment. While those are dangerous, and may cause trauma to the dog if used incorrectly, I do believe they can work sometimes. The only thing I totally don't like about it is that he doesn't know that his methods are based on operant and classical conditioning. There is no magical calm assertive energy that magically tells your dog your every wish and makes him obey them.
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