Why do ppl get breeds of dogs that have bad health issues and not do anything to help it?

Suni BowlingSuni Bowling Posts: 876Member
edited 25 October, 2012 in Dog Health
I'm a veterinary technician and I just recently started at a veterinary hospital. Today we had a bull dog that had BAD yeasty ears and a yeast-like smell coming from his folds. His left eye was also a dark red and covered in a yellowish-green mucous. What makes me mad is that people get the dog breeds that have a lot of health issues that they are aware of and yet they refuse to pay the extra money to take care of that health problem or go the extra mile to make sure their dog is in a comfortable state. I felt so bad for this bulldog. He has chronic dry eye and probably an underlying eye issue and the owners will not pay for artificial tears to help lube the eye or even let the doctor's look more into the eye and help treat it. Every bulldog owner and other owners of squishy-faced breeds knows that they eventually will need artificial tears because they are so bug-eyed, prone to ear infections, and need their wrinkles clean out on a daily basis. We were literally digging out yellow discharge that had looked like phlegm out of this bulldogs' ears. What I don't understand is if you know that certain breeds have abundant amount of health issues/problems and your not in the kind of shape to get the vet attention it deserves when these health issues pop up or you REFUSE to get the treatment it deserves; why even get the dog in the first place??? Is it because the dog was sooooooo cute as a puppy and you just had to have it without even thinking the potential health issues it can have later in life. To me that is selfish. They are only thinking about themselves and not for the well-being and welfare of the pet. Ppl think too much of what other ppl are going to think and say when they own a certain dog breed that they think is cute or cool looking. For example, my little brother who is turning 18 next month wants a cane corso or a presa canario. That has bad news written ALL over that situation if he ever does become an owner to one of those breeds. He told me and I quote that he wants either a cane corso or a presa canario because they look like a pit bull on steroids. And I told him you need to do EXTENSIVE research on both those breeds before getting one. They are both a dominant breed and I can totally see an ACCIDENT or DISASTER happening if he ever owns one. :-k:-/ Not only that but I know my little brother will not have the means to take care of one or even the funds to take it to the vets for an emergency. But you know he is about to turn 18 and he thinks he is right all the time and thinks he knows how the world works. I just don't understand people and I may never ever understand them. That's why I'll keep on helping animals get better and saving them. Go right ahead and put your two cents in it everyone! ~a~

Comments

  • Evelyn CummingsEvelyn Cummings Posts: 11,879Member
    edited 21 October, 2012
    IMO, MOST of the issues like this bulldog can be blamed on the breeders/sellers not educating the puppy buyers. I do believe more than 75% of these buyers got the dog on impulse, either directly from a BYB OR from a pet store, NEITHER of which did one iota of education when it comes to potential health issues with the breed. Furthermore, had these buyers done some research, most likely they could have ended up with a healthy dog from a reputable breeder instead of something cranked out just for profit. Just yesterday I got emails from THREE owners who had purchased Frenchies from me...the youngest was 10 years old, the oldest 13. NOT ONE of these dogs has health issues and these people were calling inquiring about adding another Frenchie to their family. They WERE educated and knew that WHERE you get your dog is more important than how much you spend, and they all knew what to look for in terms of prebreeding testing, etc. Had the above bulldog owners been educated about health issues perhaps they would have ended up with a healthy dog. Not all bulldogs have eye/ear issues if responsible breeding practices are followed.
  • DeaDea NHPosts: 7,176Member ✭✭✭
    edited 21 October, 2012
    That very reason is why a couldn't employed in the animal health profession. I would drive away the business, because I would tell any irresponsible person what I thought. :-$
  • StellaStella Posts: 6,822Member
    edited 21 October, 2012
    You can't fix Stupid or lazy..........:n: When I got Rusty (Cocker Spaniel), he went to the vet the very next day to have his ears & eyes checked (as well as the usual fecal, blood, urine, etc). His breed has issues with both. Now I have ear cleaning solution and antibiotics for both ears & eyes if they fire up with a problem. Some people just get a breed because of it's look (cute or mean :/), do no research, and the poor dog pays the price. I've avoided certain breeds I'd like to have due to severe health issues or short life spans. I'm willing to do the work, but hate to lose my pal sooner than I'd expect to. :-/
  • Caroline MoscaCaroline Mosca Posts: 153Member
    edited 21 October, 2012
    That has to be so hard- you must want to yank that dog away from the owners and then put noxious things in their eyes and ears and let them see how it feels !:-O FYI- don't know if this matters, but you have a lot of identifying information in your post (the name of the hospital, location, breed and specifics about the dog)....the world is a very small place now and could your employment be jeopardized by this owner hearing about the post and going back to the vet's office? It's a very small world out there. I'm sure all you said was true, just wanted to offer that perspective. It may not be a big deal.
  • Suni BowlingSuni Bowling Posts: 876Member
    edited 21 October, 2012
    Well for one nobody at my clinic has seen my dogs so there is no possible way they can tell who created the topic. But thank you for your concern. There's actually some doctors who do get blunt towards the owners and tell them exactly how they feel about their patients health. I have dachshunds and am well aware of the back problems they can end up getting. Jazz my little mini wirehaired dachshund ended up getting a small mild case of IVDD. I had a holistic vet perform acupuncture on his back once a week for about 3 months. The inflammation and swelling went down. I now have stairs for my bed and couch and i don't let my dachshunds jump. My huskies also can have eye, thyroid, and hip issues. And I did my research before getting my huskies so I know what to be prepared for.
  • Kasie NaklickKasie Naklick Posts: 355Member
    edited 21 October, 2012
    As a groomer, I see the same sort of thing. People get a poodle or a maltese and take no effort to brush or comb it, let it get completely matted and yell at us when we say we're going to shave it. If you don't want to bother with it, get a beagle. It's frustrating but all you can do is try and educate people.
  • Angel_LexiAngel_Lexi Duluth,MNPosts: 29,607Member ✭✭✭
    edited 21 October, 2012
    People do need to be careful when getting a particular breed and also must remember not getting proper vet care for a dog whom is in need is considered abuse in many states.. Who suffers..THE ANIMALS for the ignorance of their owners.
  • Suni BowlingSuni Bowling Posts: 876Member
    edited 22 October, 2012
    He looked so uncomfortable in his own skin :(( people NEED to do EXTENSIVE research on breeds before just buying one because they are cute, cool, or gorgeous. That animal may have a lot of health issues and you won't know it until its too late. People are so ignorant. They don't realize that if they don't treat the certain health issue like that bulldogs' eye, the animals are the ones that are suffering. I will never understand ppl which is probably hy I have 4 dogs and 3 ferrets
  • Suni BowlingSuni Bowling Posts: 876Member
    edited 23 October, 2012
    There was a family who had taken one of the Lab puppies that I was fostering and their son had done a lot of research on Labrador retrievers. It just surprised me that an 11 year old boy had done the research on this breed. On the history, the certain characteristics of the breed, and the health issues of the breed. If a 11 year old can do research and show such responsibility then why can't grown adults do the same? Children aren't suppose to be doing research but it still showed me that he wanted this dog more than anything in the world. Which is why I approved of this family to take the puppy.
  • Patti DevriesPatti Devries Posts: 1,374Member
    edited 23 October, 2012
    I don't know anything about breeding and specifications and all that other garbage but humans are definitely to blame for the health of some breeds. From my brief research into English Bulldogs they practically LIVE in the vet's office. And all their orthopedic and skin issues have been created by show breed specifications. Ditto that we adopted a homeless cat many years ago. From her stooped posture and difficulty jumping and walking we just assumed she had a birth defect. I found out later she is a "Munchkin". She was bred to have abnormally short legs...and people pay $$$$$$$ for such cats even though they can barely walk. The English bulldog we were going to adopt had an eye cyst and was monster overweight, so you just know it had leg problems, back problems, vision problems too. I felt bad for the dog but the guy was just looking to recoup the money he paid for it. I don't have patience with people who are into breeding and purebreeds and all. The shelters are overflowing with healthy loveable mutts, so idiot people are out there making money breeding mutants instead.
  • edited 23 October, 2012
    All purebred breeders are out there making money breeding mutants and all the shelter dogs are obviously healthy and arise from spontaneous generation. Got it.
  • Mike JacobsenMike Jacobsen Posts: 53Member
    edited 23 October, 2012
    Why? Based purely on conversations with a good number of others over the years, and, now, particularly, as we walk our newly adopted SP twice daily, because a lot of people simply "impulse buy." "Oh, they're so cute." Or have very "primitive notions" about dog breeds ... "We want a small dog." or a "Big dog." A "fluffy dog." Or simply reearch on dog breeds means nothing ... "I can tell a good dog when I see one." Or research on dog breeds is "boring." I've been told many times, "breed standards mean nothing, just lies by the breeders." And, of course, combinations of all of the above, and that's just a beginning. Why don't people do more research about political candidates? Bad choices there effect their lives too. Why don't so many people properly care for their animals? See above. And the costs of vets, and grooming, and healthy food, etc. Spend $50 on some cute puppie from someone's "back yard" and that's enough. Table scraps. A collar, maybe, if their yard isn't fenced in. Rabies? Why? Registration? What's that? "A dog is a dog." Why don't some people take proper care of their children, their grand-parents? Finally, and I'll probably get some "heat" about this ... there is always the "shelters." If it is not working out, abandon the dog, or "drop off" the dog. Pretty easy. Some of the members of our species are simply not very responsible. Or not very long on respect for other creatures. How about we treat all "sales" as we do legal adoptions in our society? You have to earn your right to a new family member! Before we had child abuse laws we had animal abuse laws. In fact, the early child abuse advocates were also animal rights activists, some of the same people that pushed for animal abuse laws.
  • mark johnnmark johnn Posts: 2Member
    edited 25 October, 2012
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    edited 25 October, 2012
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  • Suni BowlingSuni Bowling Posts: 876Member
    edited 24 October, 2012
    Opheila - the most pets we see in my clinic is bulldogs, pugs, pekingese (sp?), shih tzus, lhaso apso's, basset hounds, and dachshunds. We do see mixed breeds and other breeds of dogs. But that's the majority of breeds we see. About your munchkin cat. I've seen them and I think the so called "creators" of this breed decided to take on the same short legs idea from the dachshunds and bassets. Although dachshunds and bassets have a reason for their short legs and long backs. Dachshunds were bred to have short legs to be able to be close to the ground and get into the badger holes. Bassets were bred to have short legs so they can be closer to the ground to follow a scent since they are scent hounds. For actual "pure bred" that have been around for a long time all have a reason for their certain characteristics. All though with dachshunds and bassets they do have back issues. We mostly see dachshunds and bassets with back issues from them jumping off and on furniture and when they are obese. When I see an obese dachshund I literally cringe thinking "oh god, that poor dog must have had back problems in the past or is looking forward to back injuries in the near future" With my dachshunds I keep them at a healthy weight and have stairs for my furniture and bed so I can reduce the risk of them having a back injury. Cats should not be bred to have short legs. That is my opinion though. Guest - I totally know what you mean I just wish we had more responsible ppl who had the brains to actually research a breed before getting that particular breed and not the impulse to get that breed because it's cute and what not.
  • Amy OsborneAmy Osborne EdmontonPosts: 1,907Member
    edited 24 October, 2012
    "Is it because the dog was sooooooo cute as a puppy and you just had to have it without even thinking the potential health issues it can have later in life" Yup.
  • Tod KnudsenTod Knudsen MovillePosts: 3,793Member
    edited 24 October, 2012
    I think a lot of the problems have come about from the designer breeds and owning a certain breed just to look cool like people on tv. The breeders are more interested in making money then putting out a good line of dog. No one does the research about the breed of dog anymore. Before I got my first show dog, I did much research and I knew what problems could come with them. I really do not know what to do to help this problem unless we go to very strict breeding laws for these people.
  • Suni BowlingSuni Bowling Posts: 876Member
    edited 25 October, 2012
    I will admit that when I got my Husky Mishka I didn't do any research on huskies but at the time that I got her, her life was in jeopardy. I rescued her from a man that was going to shoot her! Just because he was moving and didn't want her anymore. My boyfriend and I were driving to my best friend's house in Arizona when I saw this man pointing his gun at this beautiful husky. I had my boyfriend pull over and I told him "I'll save you the bullet and take the dog with me". But as soon as we got home I did all my research and all the ins and outs on the breed. So when we decided to get our Siberian Husky Luna we knew what we were getting ourselves into and how much dedication this breed needs. We were already prepared. And I do agree that the ppl who started breeding odd mixes together and creating what they think are cute names for the breed is what caused a lot ppl to get breeds they have no clue about just because they think they will look cool because they have that certain breed.
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