What's Your Favorite Designer Dog?

Aleasha CasarettoAleasha Casaretto ColleyvillePosts: 512Member
edited 12 April, 2015 in Choosing the Right Dog
My favorite are the Cockapoo, Malti-Poo, Labradoodle, Goldendoodle, Mal-Shi, Puggle, Schnoodle, Yorkipoo, Pomchi and Cheeks. :D What are yours?

Comments

  • Mindy MalletteMindy Mallette Posts: 24,408Member
    edited 2 April, 2015
    mutts without a cutesy name attached.
  • Katie HerrmannKatie Herrmann AuroraPosts: 3,681Member
    edited 3 April, 2015
    Rescue-Mutts.
  • Evelyn CummingsEvelyn Cummings Posts: 11,879Member
    edited 4 April, 2015
    Homeless mutts NOT bred by someone to make a buck on their cutesy names by promoting them as something they are not.
  • Vicky ChanVicky Chan MarkhamPosts: 3,542Member
    edited 5 April, 2015
    Toto, I don't see anything wrong with breeding designer breeds as long as all health and genetic testing is done. I actually think that purebreds can have a lot more health problems due to inbreedding. Sometimes the purebred gene is way too small. With designer mutts, you can often cross out a lot of problems. I know you've probably been in the kennel business a lot longer than I've been alive, and I'd respect your choice for not purchasing from a designer breeder, but I don't think it's necessary to think badly of them and the people who support them. :-k Jasper, to answer your question, I'm not sure whether my favourite would be considered a "designer", but I think the king shepherds are pretty neat. I guess that's more a rare breed? :-k
  • Evelyn CummingsEvelyn Cummings Posts: 11,879Member
    edited 5 April, 2015
    Yoshi, I know of NO designer dog breeders who do basic health screening, much less screen for genetic problems. They seem to have the mistaken belief that "hybrid vigor" will trump ALL genetic diseases. Trust me, as a groomer I see the results of all these designer dogs... dogs who cannot stand up because their knees/hips are so bad, can't close their mouth due to such severe mouth defects, can't breathe because of genetic issues from crossing snub nose breeds with long nose breeds, and on and on and on. NONE of these dogs have had ANY health screening, in fact most of them do not even have a basic puppy first exam and vaccinations when the people buy them, usually out of the back of a truck at the local shopping plaza. Even with obvious health deformities the people still buy them because they feel sorry for them, which, as we all know, creates MORE demand for breeding more deformed dogs and on and on and on.
  • Vicky ChanVicky Chan MarkhamPosts: 3,542Member
    edited 5 April, 2015
    I don't dispute that those BYBs exist, but it doesn't account for every single designer breeder in the world. Have you ever watched this show on CMT called pick a puppy? There's a lot of designer breeders on there and they don't just breed out of a truck to make a profit. I believe they put a lot of thought into their breeding. :) I think I even saw a show one time where a vet explained the genetic benefits of cross-breeding.
  • Alexa TravisAlexa Travis Birmingham, ALPosts: 4,692Member
    edited 5 April, 2015
    Truly random, multi-generational crossing would likely produce enough genetic diversity to create healthier animals, yes. Designer dogs are NOT privileged to those benefits, however. Direct F1 crosses of purebred animals, as most of these dogs are, will honestly not produce enough diversity to eliminate even the most common (and most debilitating) genetic defects. As I've stated in the past... crossing a Poodle with hip dysplasia to a Lab with hip dysplasia will NOT magically produce puppies free of hip dysplasia! And realistically speaking here, the overwhelming majority of reputable breeders producing breed-worthy dogs would NOT be selling stock to people who they knew were going to be crossing them to make so-called "designer" crosses... so we're already talking about a sub-standard gene pool to begin with. You do the math.
  • Vicky ChanVicky Chan MarkhamPosts: 3,542Member
    edited 6 April, 2015
    Then what if you cross a healthy lab with a healthy poodle. Ain't nothing wrong with that is there?
  • Katie HerrmannKatie Herrmann AuroraPosts: 3,681Member
    edited 8 April, 2015
    What Mulder said: "And realistically speaking here, the overwhelming majority of reputable breeders producing breed-worthy dogs would NOT be selling stock to people who they knew were going to be crossing them to make so-called "designer" crosses... so we're already talking about a sub-standard gene pool to begin with. You do the math." The odds of a well bred dog ending up with a "breeder" that creates these "designer" dogs are slim. When breeding, a truly healthy dog is just one that looks healthy, it's one that has been tested for genetic health concerns related to their breed- for example hip dysplasia, eye disease, degenerative myelopathy, etc. Not to mention dogs that have proven to have correct temperament for their breed. With the millions of dogs being euthanized every year, we need to be EXTREMELY careful about creating more.
  • Vicky ChanVicky Chan MarkhamPosts: 3,542Member
    edited 8 April, 2015
    There's so much more red tape that has to go into dog breeding.
  • Mindy MalletteMindy Mallette Posts: 24,408Member
    edited 8 April, 2015
    seriously? hep me. o, hep!
  • Katie HerrmannKatie Herrmann AuroraPosts: 3,681Member
    edited 8 April, 2015
    Dogs are not humans. Not even close.
  • Evelyn CummingsEvelyn Cummings Posts: 11,879Member
    edited 6 April, 2015
    Yoshi, I cannot understand why you find it so necessary to use profanity in every post. Not only is it in poor taste on a family site, it is extremely immature. I have notified both your posts as well.
  • Sarah SmithSarah Smith Posts: 66Member
    edited 10 April, 2015
    Mine aren't designer, but I wouldn't be upset if they were ;) Reuben is a ACD/GSD mix. He is AMAZING. Very high energy breed, protective, and loyal, but still totally friendly. Not many health issues outside of Allergies and now that he's older, he's been tearing his ACL's because he realize he's old. And Heidi is newer, but she is sooo much fun and gets so much attention when we go anywhere. Shes a Dutchie/Malinois. She is also high energy, but has a good off switch. I've put a ton of work into her, both medically, and physically ;) We walk/run about 2 miles every day. And then we go in the backyard and play fetch. She's had mange (so yes, she is spayed), as well as a broken tail (she came with it), also had an episode of bloat. So, maybe the breed wouldn't be the best to breed, but she makes up for it all in personality and teach ability. So yes, I will go with rescue mutts ;) They are my favorites!
  • Alexa TravisAlexa Travis Birmingham, ALPosts: 4,692Member
    edited 10 April, 2015
    To be fair Heidi, Malinois and Dutchies are, in many circles, not really considered different breeds in terms of how they are bred. Lots of people in working circles interbreed them... if they come out brindle they are Dutches, fawn they are Mals. Yes, technically in the KC's eyes they are separate, but functionally as a breed they really aren't. And on that note, I personally have no issue whatsoever with crossing breeds or breeding "mutts" IF there is a functional purpose behind it. If farmer Joe has two excellent herding dogs of no particular breed, and wants more excellent herding dogs, I doesn't bother me one bit if they breed those dogs (though I would be bothered if they didn't find the remaining puppies homes/ditched them). "Breeds" like lurcher, bandogs, eurohound, etc also do not bother me, as they too are bred for a function that they will most likely be utilized in (and again, provided the people breeding them have a plan as to where all of the resulting puppies will end up, working quality or not).
  • Katie HerrmannKatie Herrmann AuroraPosts: 3,681Member
    edited 10 April, 2015
    My post says "edited by author". I did not edit it, a moderator did. And now it makes no sense.
  • DeaDea NHPosts: 7,176Member ✭✭✭
    edited 11 April, 2015
    Sarah, do you know what they changed?
  • Evelyn CummingsEvelyn Cummings Posts: 11,879Member
    edited 11 April, 2015
    Hmmmm, I wonder how legal it is to have a post on a public forum edited by someone else without the author's knowledge, THEN have that edit attributed to the author when the author has no idea it was even edited???? And, everyone thinks Hillary is bad for keeping her emails private???? We can't keep our posts public on here! Sooo, I guess copyright doesn't mean anything, either...all you gotta do is copy away and someone else will come along and edit YOUR post to read where they "think" you maybe copied it from, even if they have NO IDEA where it came from. I wonder if that someone else will pay the copyright violation fine?????
  • Mindy MalletteMindy Mallette Posts: 24,408Member
    edited 11 April, 2015
    mine also says "edited by moderator" but because it was just a brief bit of nonsense, I can tell that the text was not changed. So...maybe it shows that statement, but really wasn't? (Except you said yours no longer made sense.)
  • Katie HerrmannKatie Herrmann AuroraPosts: 3,681Member
    edited 11 April, 2015
    They removed my reference to the post made by the person above me, and my statement that they made the post to stir up trouble. It would be one thing if they said "edited by moderator" but it says that -I- edited it, which I most definitely did not.
  • Leah C-Leah C- Posts: 11Member
    edited 12 April, 2015
    Designer breed..... none. I do like working-dog crosses, like Bull Lurchers and so on, but they're far from designer breeds, aha.
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